THE SIXTH SEAL: NEW YORK CITY (REV 6:12)

Earthquake activity in the New York City area

Wikipedia

Although the eastern United States is not as

seismically active

as regions near plate boundaries, large and damaging earthquakes do occur there. Furthermore, when these rare eastern U.S. earthquakes occur, the areas affected by them are much larger than for western U.S. earthquakes of the same magnitude.

Thus, earthquakes represent at least a moderate hazard to East Coast cities, including New York City and adjacent areas of very high population density.

Seismicity in the vicinity of New York City. Data are from the U.S. Geological Survey (Top, USGS) and the National Earthquake Information Center (Bottom, NEIC). In the top figure, closed red circles indicate 1924-2006 epicenters and open black circles indicate locations of the larger earthquakes that occurred in 1737, 1783 and 1884. Green lines indicate the trace of the Ramapo fault.

As can be seen in the maps of earthquake activity in this region(shown in the figure),

seismicity is scattered throughout most of the New York City area, with some hint of a concentration of earthquakes in the area surrounding Manhattan Island.

The largest known earthquake in this region occurred in 1884 and had a magnitude of approximately 5.For this earthquake, observations of fallen bricks and cracked plaster were reported from eastern Pennsylvania to central Connecticut, and the maximum intensity reported was at two sites in western Long Island (Jamaica, New York and Amityville, New York).

Two other earthquakes of approximately magnitude 5 occurred in this region in 1737 and 1783. The figure on the right shows maps of the distribution of earthquakes of magnitude 3 and greater that occurred in this region from 1924 to 2010, along with locations of the larger earthquakes that occurred in 1737, 1783 and 1884.

Background

The NYC area is part of the geologically complex structure of the Northern

Appalachian Mountains. This complex structure was formed during the past half billion years when the Earth’s crust underlying the Northern Appalachians was the site of two major geological episodes, each of which has left its imprint on the NYC area bedrock.

Between about 450 million years ago and about 250 million years ago, the Northern Appalachian region was affected by a continental collision, in which the ancient African continent collided with the ancient North American continent to form the supercontinent Pangaea.

Beginning about 200 million years ago, the present-day Atlantic ocean began to form as plate tectonic forces began to

rift

apart the continent of Pangaea. The last major episode of geological activity to affect the

bedrock

in the New York area occurred about 100 million years ago, during the Mesozoic era, when continental rifting that led to the opening of the present-day Atlantic ocean formed the Hartford and

Newark

Mesozoic rift basins.

Earthquake rates in the northeastern United States are about 50 to 200 times lower than in California, but

the earthquakes that do occur in the northeastern U.S. are typically felt over a much broader region than earthquakes of the same magnitude in the western U.S.This means the area of damage from an earthquake in the northeastern U.S. could be larger than the area of damage caused by an earthquake of the same magnitude in the western U.S. The cooler rocks in the northeastern U.S. contribute to the seismic energy propagating as much as ten times further than in the warmer rocks of California.

A magnitude 4.0 eastern U.S. earthquake typically can be felt as far as 100 km (60 mi) from its

epicenter, but it infrequently causes damage near its source. A magnitude 5.5 eastern U.S. earthquake, although uncommon, can be felt as far as 500 km (300 mi) from its epicenter, and can cause damage as far away as 40 km (25 mi) from its epicenter. Earthquakes stronger than about magnitude 5.0 generate ground motions that are strong enough to be damaging in the epicentral area.

At well-studied plate boundaries like the

San Andreas fault

system in California, scientists can often make observations that allow them to identify the specific fault on which an earthquake took place. In contrast, east of the Rocky Mountains this is rarely the case.

The NYC area is far from the boundaries of the North American plate, which are in the center of the Atlantic Ocean, in the Caribbean Sea, and along the west coast of North America. The seismicity of the northeastern U.S. is generally considered to be due to ancient zones of weakness that are being reactivated in the present-day stress field. In this model, pre-existing faults that were formed during ancient geological episodes persist in the intraplate crust, and the earthquakes occur when the present-day stress is released along these zones of weakness.

The stress that causes the earthquakes is generally considered to be derived from present-day rifting at the Mid-Atlantic ridge.

Earthquakes and geologically mapped faults in the Northeastern U.S.

The northeastern U.S. has many known faults, but virtually all of the known faults have not been active for perhaps 90 million years or more. Also, the locations of the known faults are not well determined at earthquake depths. Accordingly, few (if any) earthquakes in the region can be unambiguously linked to known faults.

Given the current geological and seismological data, it is difficult to determine if a known fault in this region is still active today and could produce a modern earthquake. As in most other areas east of the Rocky Mountains, the best guide to earthquake hazard in the northeastern U.S. is probably the locations of the past earthquakes themselves.

The Ramapo fault and other New York City area faults

The Ramapo Fault, which marks the western boundary of the Newark rift basin, has been argued to be a major seismically active feature of this region,but it is difficult to discern the extent to which the Ramapo fault (or any other specific mapped fault in the area) might be any more of a source of future earthquakes than any other parts of the region. The Ramapo Fault zone spans more than 185 miles (300 kilometers) in

New York,

New Jersey, and

Pennsylvania. It is a system of

faults

between the northern

Appalachian Mountains

and Piedmont areas to the east. This fault is perhaps the best known fault zone in the Mid-Atlantic region, and some small earthquakes have been known to occur in its vicinity. Recently, public knowledge about the fault has increased – especially after the 1970s, when the fault’s proximity to the Indian Point nuclear plant in New York was noticed.

There is insufficient evidence to unequivocally demonstrate any strong correlation of earthquakes in the New York City area with specific faults or other geologic structures in this region. The damaging earthquake affecting New York City in 1884 was probably not associated with the Ramapo fault because the strongest shaking from that earthquake occurred on Long Island (quite far from the trace of the Ramapo fault). The relationship between faults and earthquakes in the New York City area is currently understood to be more complex than any simple association of a specific earthquake with a specific mapped fault.

A 2008 study argued that a magnitude 6 or 7 earthquake might originate from the Ramapo fault zone,

which would almost definitely spawn hundreds or even thousands of fatalities and billions of dollars in damage. Studying around 400 earthquakes over the past 300 years, the study also argued that there was an additional fault zone extending from the Ramapo Fault zone into southwestern Connecticut. As can be seen in the above figure of seismicity, earthquakes are scattered throughout this region, with no particular concentration of activity along the Ramapo fault, or along the hypothesized fault zone extending into southwestern Connecticut.

Just off the northern terminus of the Ramapo fault is the

Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, built between 1956 and 1960 by

Consolidated Edison Company. The plant began operating in 1963, and it has been the subject of a controversy over concerns that an earthquake from the Ramapo fault will affect the power plant. Whether or not the Ramapo fault actually does pose a threat to this nuclear power plant remains an open question.

We Should Worry About Nuclear War on the Horizon: Revelation 16

Fear Of Nuclear War Renewed As Russia Looks For Breakthrough In Ukraine

Fear Of Nuclear War Renewed As Russia Looks For Breakthrough In Ukraine

With Moscow on the back foot in its offensive, the military stalemate has raised fears Russia could resort to its nuclear arsenal to achieve a breakthrough.

World NewsAgence France-PresseUpdated: December 28, 2022 10:55 am IST

One Ex-Russian diplomat warned that Putin felt Russia’s existence threatened, “he will press the button”.

Paris: 

Banished from public consciousness for decades, the nightmare of nuclear warfare has surged back to prominence with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, highlighting the erosion of the Cold War global security architecture.

With Moscow on the back foot in its offensive, the military stalemate has raised fears Russia could resort to its nuclear arsenal to achieve a breakthrough.

Russia, along with Britain, China, France and the United States, are the five recognised nuclear weapons powers and permanent UN Security Council members.

“It’s the first time a nuclear power has used its status to wage a conventional war under the shadow cast by nuclear weapons,” said Camille Grand, a former NATO deputy secretary-general.

“One might have imagined that rogue states would adopt such an attitude, but suddenly it’s one of the two major nuclear powers, a member of the UN Security Council,” he told AFP, insisting the actual use of the weapons remains “improbable”.

For now, the moral and strategic nuclear “taboo” that emerged after the US bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II in 1945 still holds.

But rhetoric has escalated massively.

Russian TV broadcasts since the invasion of Ukraine have repeatedly discussed nuclear strikes on Western cities like Paris or New York.

One former Russian diplomat, asking not to be named, warned that if President Vladimir Putin felt Russia’s existence threatened, “he will press the button”.

The year’s events have been a harsh wake-up call for Europe, which spent decades in a state of relative ease in terms of nuclear security, enjoying the so-called Cold War “peace dividend”.

Across the Atlantic, US President Joe Biden warned in October of a potential “Armageddon” hanging over the world.

Disarmament ‘in ruins’

“The most spectacular event of the past half century is one that did not occur,” Nobel-winning economist and strategy expert Thomas Schelling wrote in 2007.

But the framework that kept world leaders’ fingers off the button after 1945 had been crumbling for years before Putin’s order to invade.

In 2002, the United States quit the critical Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty it had signed with the Soviet Union in 1972, which maintained the nuclear balance of power.

Other important agreements fell away in the years that followed, including the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty that Washington dropped in 2019, blaming Russia for not complying.

“Regarding disarmament, it’s all in ruins, apart from New Start,” Grand said, referring to the Barack Obama-era agreement with Russia to reduce numbers of warheads, missiles, bombers and launchers.

‘Very dangerous crisis’

India, North Korea and Pakistan, along with the five recognised powers, also have nuclear weapons, while Israel is widely assumed to do so while having never officially acknowledged it.

North Korea sharply stepped up missile testing this year, continuing its pursuit of an independent nuclear deterrent that began when it quit the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in 2003.

Washington, Seoul and Tokyo all believe a seventh nuclear weapons test by Pyongyang is imminent.

The isolated dictatorship announced in September a new nuclear doctrine, making clear that it would never give up the weapons and that they could be used pre-emptively.

“We’re going to see a very dangerous crisis in Asia,” Chung Min Lee, a researcher at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, recently told a Paris conference.

Non-nuclear countries in the region fear that the protection provided by the US nuclear umbrella is fraying.

“If you imagine extended deterrence as a water balloon, today the water balloon has some critical holes and water is seeping out,” he added.

China’s nuclear arsenal is also growing, with Pentagon estimates putting it at 1,000 warheads — roughly on par with US bombs — within a decade.

And in the Middle East, the struggle to revive the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, hobbled by its brutal repression of recent protests at home, has revived fears that Tehran could soon be a “threshold state” on the brink of building a bomb.

Proliferation fears

In August, a UN conference on the future of the NPT saw a joint declaration by 191 countries blocked at the last moment by Russia.

One French diplomat reported “extraordinarily aggressive nuclear rhetoric” from Moscow and “disdain” for the treaty.

“We saw a break in Russia’s attitude, which had historically been in support of the NPT,” the diplomat added.

China was “very vocal”, offering a “very crude denunciation” of the US-UK-Australia AUKUS Pacific alliance that will deliver nuclear-powered submarines to Canberra, the diplomat said.

Beijing claimed that the alliance risked further nuclear proliferation, while failing to “lift doubts about the opacity of its own nuclear doctrine or the speed at which its arsenal is growing”.

The invasion of a state that willingly gave up nuclear weapons, Ukraine, by its nuclear-armed neighbour has increased fears of proliferation.

“Today, countries like Japan or South Korea might legitimately ask whether” they need a bomb of their own, said Jean-Louis Lozier, a former head of France’s nuclear forces.

“The same is true in the Middle East of Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Egypt,” he added.

2Comments(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

Seismic Activity Before the Sixth Seal: Revelation 6:12

QUAKE DATA | INTERACTIVE MAP | NEW: SEISMOGRAMS | USER REPORTS | EARLIER QUAKES HERE | QUAKES IN THE US | NEW YORK | NEW JERSEY | WASHINGTON DCReported seismic-like event (likely no quake): 17 mi northwest of New York, USA, Monday, Dec 26, 2022 at 12:57 am (GMT -5)

Reported seismic-like event (likely no quake): 17 mi northwest of New York, USA, Monday, Dec 26, 2022 at 12:57 am (GMT -5) – 1 day 17 hours ago

Updated: Dec 27, 2022 16:25 GMT – 7 hours ago refresh

26 Dec 06:03 UTC: First to report: VolcanoDiscovery after 6 minutes.

Earthquake details

Date & timeDec 26, 2022 05:57:17 UTC – 1 day 17 hours ago
Local time at epicenterMonday, Dec 26, 2022 at 12:57 am (GMT -5)
Statusdisregarded
Magnitudeunknown (3?)
Depth10.0 km
Epicenter latitude / longitude40.84122°N / 74.27857°W  (New YorkUnited States)
Antipode40.841°S / 105.721°E
Shaking intensityWeak shaking
Felt1 report
Primary data sourceVolcanoDiscovery (User-reported shaking)
Nearby towns and cities21 km (13 mi) NW of Jersey City (New Jersey) (pop: 264,300) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
24 km (15 mi) NW of Bayonne (New Jersey) (pop: 66,300) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
27 km (17 mi) WNW of New York (pop: 8,175,100) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
28 km (18 mi) NW of Tompkinsville (New York) (pop: 8,340) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
33 km (21 mi) NW of Borough Park (New York) (pop: 149,200) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
34 km (21 mi) NW of Flatbush (New York) (pop: 93,400) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
35 km (22 mi) NW of Brooklyn (New York) (pop: 2,300,700) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
320 km (199 mi) NE of Washington (District of Columbia) (pop: 601,700) | Show on map | Quakes nearby
Weather at epicenter at time of quakeClear Sky  -7°C (19 F), humidity: 57%, wind: 8 m/s (15 kts) from W

500 km

300 mi

+

Leaflet | © Esri— Sources: GEBCO, NOAA, CHS, OSU, UNH, CSUMB, National Geographic, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, and Esri

[smaller] [bigger]

Most recent quakes Top 20 past 24 hrs Quakes in the US

Seismograms

Seismic station: Fordham University, The Bronx, NYC (FOR/LD network) | Distance from quake: 33 km / 21 mi | Show on map | Station Info

Seismic station Fordham University, The Bronx, NYC: vertical movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Thin dotted red line indicates time of quake. Seismic waves arrive some time later, depending on distance. Bandpass filter applied: 0.5-10.0 Hz. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Show less

Seismic station Fordham University, The Bronx, NYC: horizontal (E-W) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)
Seismic station Fordham University, The Bronx, NYC: horizontal (N-S) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismograms around time of quake, showing horizontal E-W and N-S ground movements. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station: Black Rock Forest, Cornwall, NY (BRNY/LD network) | Distance from quake: 67 km / 42 mi | Show on map | Station Info

Seismic station Black Rock Forest, Cornwall, NY: vertical movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Thin dotted red line indicates time of quake. Seismic waves arrive some time later, depending on distance. Bandpass filter applied: 0.5-10.0 Hz. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station Black Rock Forest, Cornwall, NY: horizontal (E-W) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)
Seismic station Black Rock Forest, Cornwall, NY: horizontal (N-S) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismograms around time of quake.
Top: vertical movement, bottom: horizontal (E-W and N-S) movements. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station: Greenville, DE, USA (GEDE/LD network) | Distance from quake: 162 km / 101 mi | Show on map | Station Info

Seismic station Greenville, DE, USA: vertical movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Thin dotted red line indicates time of quake. Seismic waves arrive some time later, depending on distance. Bandpass filter applied: 0.5-10.0 Hz. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station Greenville, DE, USA: horizontal (E-W) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)
Seismic station Greenville, DE, USA: horizontal (N-S) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismograms around time of quake.
Top: vertical movement, bottom: horizontal (E-W and N-S) movements. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station: Warrington Farm, Harbeson, DE (WADE/LD network) | Distance from quake: 254 km / 158 mi | Show on map | Station Info

Seismic station Warrington Farm, Harbeson, DE: vertical movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Thin dotted red line indicates time of quake. Seismic waves arrive some time later, depending on distance. Bandpass filter applied: 0.5-10.0 Hz. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station: Lake Ozonia, New York, USA (LONY/US network) | Distance from quake: 421 km / 262 mi | Show on map | Station Info

Seismic station Lake Ozonia, New York, USA: vertical movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismogram (vertical component) around time of quake. Thin dotted red line indicates time of quake. Seismic waves arrive some time later, depending on distance. Bandpass filter applied: 0.5-10.0 Hz. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

Seismic station Lake Ozonia, New York, USA: horizontal (E-W) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)
Seismic station Lake Ozonia, New York, USA: horizontal (N-S) movement plot around time of quake (source: IRIS/BUD)

Seismograms around time of quake.
Top: vertical movement, bottom: horizontal (E-W and N-S) movements. Source: IRIS Buffer of Uniform Data (BUD) webtool

The End is Nigh: Revelation 8

The end is nigh? Climate, nuclear crises spark fears of worst

Issued on: 27/12/2022 – 05:02Modified: 27/12/2022 – 05:01

Washington (AFP) – For thousands of years, predictions of apocalypse have come and gone. But with dangers rising from nuclear war and climate change, does the planet need to at least begin contemplating the worst?

When the world rang in 2022, few would have expected the year to feature the US president speaking of the risk of doomsday, following Russia’s threats to go nuclear in its invasion of Ukraine.

“We have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban missile crisis” in 1962, Joe Biden said in October.

And on the year that humanity welcomed its eighth billion member, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that the planet was on a “highway to climate hell.”

In extremes widely attributed to climate change, floods submerged one-third of Pakistan, China sweat under an unprecedented 70-day heatwave, and crops failed in the Horn of Africa — all while the world lagged behind on the UN-blessed goal of checking warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.

Biggest risk yet of nuclear war?

The Global Challenges Foundation, a Swedish group that assesses catastrophic risks, warned in an annual report that the threat of nuclear weapons use was the greatest since 1945 when the United States destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki in history’s only atomic attacks.

Ukrainian firefighters push out a fire after a strike in Zaporizhzhia, home of Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, in October 2022 © Marina Moiseyenko / AFP/File

The report warned that an all-out exchange of nuclear weapons, besides causing an enormous loss of life, would trigger clouds of dust that would obscure the sun, reducing the capacity to grow food and ushering in “a period of chaos and violence, during which most of the surviving world population would die from hunger.”

Kennette Benedict, a lecturer at the University of Chicago who led the report’s nuclear section, said risks were even greater than during the Cuban Missile Crisis as Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared less restrained by advisors.

While any Russian nuclear strike would likely involve small “tactical” weapons, experts fear a quick escalation if the United States responds.

“Then we’re in a completely different ballgame,” said Benedict, a senior advisor to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which in January will unveil its latest assessment of the “doomsday clock” set since 2021 at 100 seconds to midnight.

Amid the focus on Ukraine, US intelligence believes North Korea is ready for a seventh nuclear test, Biden has effectively declared dead a deal on Iran’s contested nuclear work and tensions between India and Pakistan have remained at a low boil.

Benedict also faulted the Biden administration’s nuclear posture review which reserved the right for the United States to use nuclear weapons in “extreme circumstances.”

“I think there’s been a kind of steady erosion of the ability to manage nuclear weapons,” she said.

Charting worst-case climate risks

UN experts estimated ahead of November talks in Egypt that the world was on track to warming of 2.1 to 2.9 C — but some outside analysts put the figure well higher, with greenhouse gas emissions in 2021 again hitting a record despite pushes to renewable energy.

Luke Kemp, a Cambridge University expert on existential risks, said the possibility of higher warming was drawing insufficient attention, which he blamed on the consensus culture of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and scientists’ fears of being branded alarmist.

“There has been a strong incentive to err on the side of least drama,” he said.

“What we really need are more complex assessments of how risks would cascade around the world.”

Climate change could cause ripple effects on food, with multiple breadbasket regions failing, fueling hunger and eventually political unrest and conflict.

Pakistanis use a satellite dish to move children across a flooded area in Jaffarabad district of Balochistan in August 2022 © Fida HUSSAIN / AFP/File

Kemp warned against extrapolating from a single year or event. But a research paper he co-authored noted that even a two-degree temperature rise would put the Earth in territory uncharted since the Ice Age.

Using a medium-high scenario on emissions and population growth, it found that two billion people by 2070 could live in areas with a mean temperature of 29 C (84.2 F), straining water resources — including between India and Pakistan.

Cases for optimism

The year, however, was not all grim. While China ended the year with a surge of Covid-19 deaths, vaccinations helped much of the world turn the page on virus, which the World Health Organization estimated in May contributed to the deaths of 14.9 million people in 2020 and 2021.

Surprising jaded observers, a December conference in Montreal on biodiversity produced a major deal to protect 30 percent of the world’s land and seas, with China leading the way.

The world has seen previous warnings of worst-case scenarios, from Thomas Malthus predicting in the 18th century that food production would not keep up with population growth to the 1968 US bestseller “The Population Bomb.”

One of the most prominent current-day critics of pessimism is Harvard professor Steven Pinker, who has argued that violence has declined massively in the modern era.

Speaking after the Ukraine invasion, Pinker acknowledged Putin had brought back interstate war. But he said a failed invasion could also reinforce the positive trends.

Biden, in a Christmas address to Americans, acknowledged tough times but pointed to the decline in Covid and healthy employment rates.

“We’re surely making progress. Things are getting better,” Biden said

Existence Outside the Temple Wall is No Longer Viable: Revelation 11

articlemain

Two-state solution is no longer viable, Palestinian activist tells Limmud

‘One-state utopia’ is more preferable option for young Palestinians

BY DANIEL BEN-DAVIDDECEMBER 27, 2022 11:16

Samer Sinijlawi and Gershon Baskin address a packed room, arguing that the two-state solution has failed, at Limmud, December 26, 2022

The two state solution, widely advocated as the best way to settle the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, is dead, a Limmud audience was told.

Samer Sinijlawi, the Palestinian chief executive of the Jerusalem Development Fund, a non-profit organisation that works to improve life in the Occupied Territories, and veteran Israeli peace activist Gershon Baskin led a discussion looking at solutions “beyond the failed two-state paradigm”.

Mr Sinijlawi told a packed room: “Facts on the ground do not support two states living side by side. 

“The settlement project has won the battle. Thousands of settlers now live in more than four hundred settlements, with infrastructure connecting them. No Israeli Prime Minister or government can now remove the hundreds of thousands of settlers.”

Peace could “only be obtained through cooperation and interaction, not the building of walls and exacerbating division”.

Mr Sinijlawi claimed this view was in line with that of mainstream Palestinians, 85 per cent of whom are under the age of 45 and want to see change “not just within their lifetime, but immediately.”

Palestinians under the current system,  he said, were  “losing more than anybody else and much faster.”

He compared the current situation to a structure of two floors, with the Palestinians residing in the servants quarters while the Jews and Israelis live in the upper floor for the masters.

“The way the Palestinians see it is that they cannot take two layers of oppression, in both Israel and Hamas,” he said. “To be incorporated into a larger, one-state utopia is for the Palestinians the more feasible option.

“Israel already controls the civil register of Palestinians; Israel controls the airspace, the border, the taxation systems. Israel can keep its Jewish identity, its alliances, its friendship with the USA, but can grant rights to all citizens under its jurisdiction.

“I need to practise full civil and legal rights in the place of my birth” said Mr Sinijlawi, who is from East Jerusalem.

Hamas, who could not be defeated militarily, were the only ones to benefit from the continuation of the current system, he argued.

Mr Sinijlawi said: “There is no military solution with Hamas. Israel is trying everything possible militarily and it’s not working. The only way to defeat Hamas is politically, and that can be done.

“One of the successes that Judaism has brought to the conversation – something that the Palestinians and Hamas still must learn – is the value of life and human dignity. 

“Young Palestinians understand this: regular funerals for them are commonplace, whereas one hair is dropped from an Israeli and the entire country mourns. An identity that encourages human dignity must evolve.

“We, the Palestinians and Israelis, are not enemies of each other. Mistrust and ignorance are common enemies of our people. We should start seeing each other as a solution and not as an obstacle.”

Mr Sinijwali believed that diaspora Jews could help promote dialogue. “Palestinians want to talk and engage with Israelis and academics and leaders, and both the diaspora and Israelis can facilitate and advocate for that. There must be as much interaction as possible.”

Mr Baskin, who is director of the Holy Land Bond and has previously advocated for a two-state solution for 44 years, agreed with Mr Sinijlawi. 

“We have too often reduced the Israel-Palestine conflict to who has more pain and who therefore is owed more,” Mr Baskin said. “But it’s much more about the future than the past, though we have to recognise the past to move forward.

“What we have is two people who have territorial identity to the region. The “us here and them there” paradigm was never a roadmap to peace. Peace will not be built by walls and division, but by cooperation.

“And we will know the peace process is going well if both sides are opposing the extremists on their own side and not excusing it.”

Western policy of containing Russia will cause nuclear war: Revelation 16

Source: Xinhua

Editor: huaxia

2022-12-27 18:22:15

   \

MOSCOW, Dec. 27 (Xinhua) — The Western policy of containing Russia is extremely dangerous and fraught with risk of a direct armed clash between nuclear powers, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has said.

“Irresponsible speculation” that Russia is about to use nuclear weapons against Ukraine is unceasingly unfolding in the West, Lavrov said in an interview with TASS news agency published on Tuesday.

“We are talking about something completely different: the West’s policy of comprehensive containment of our country is extremely dangerous. It carries the risk of sliding into a direct armed clash of nuclear powers,” he said.

Moscow has repeated over and over again that there can be no winners in a nuclear war, which must never be unleashed, Lavrov added.

Western politicians are sharpening their rhetoric on the issue of a nuclear war and it is them who should be asked whether this topic will continue in 2023, he noted.

The Russian top diplomat expressed “deep concern over the propaganda bacchanalia” in the United States and Western countries in general regarding nuclear weapons. ■

The Apocalypse Cometh: Revelation 16

Earth this ear welcomed its eighth billion member, as UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that the planet was on a ‘highway to climate hell’. File photo: Nasa

Apocalypse soon? Nuclear, climate crises spark fears of worst

The world faces the threat of possible nuclear conflict and a future ‘climate hell’ as 2023 dawnsThe year 2022 was not all grim: vaccines helped much of the world turn the page on Covid-19

Earth this ear welcomed its eighth billion member, as UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that the planet was on a ‘highway to climate hell’. File photo: Nasa

For thousands of years, predictions of apocalypse have come and gone. But with dangers rising from nuclear war and climate change, does the planet need to at least begin contemplating the worst?

When the world rang in 2022, few would have expected the year to feature the US president speaking of the risk of doomsday, following Russia’s threats to go nuclear in its invasion of Ukraine.

“We have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban missile crisis” in 1962, Joe Biden said in October.

And on the year that humanity welcomed its eighth billion member, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned that the planet was on a “highway to climate hell”.

In extremes widely attributed to climate change, floods submerged one-third of Pakistan, China sweat under an unprecedented 70-day heatwave, and crops failed in the Horn of Africa – all while the world lagged behind on the UN-blessed goal of checking warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.

The Global Challenges Foundation, a Swedish group that assesses catastrophic risks, warned in an annual report that the threat of nuclear weapons use was the greatest since 1945 when the United States destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki in history’s only atomic attacks.

UN warns of resource hardships as world population passes 8 billion15 Nov 2022

The report warned that an all-out exchange of nuclear weapons, besides causing an enormous loss of life, would trigger clouds of dust that would obscure the sun, reducing the capacity to grow food and ushering in “a period of chaos and violence, during which most of the surviving world population would die from hunger”.

Kennette Benedict, a lecturer at the University of Chicago who led the report’s nuclear section, said risks were even greater than during the Cuban Missile Crisis as Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared less restrained by advisers.

While any Russian nuclear strike would likely involve small “tactical” weapons, experts fear a quick escalation if the United States responds.

“Then we’re in a completely different ballgame,” said Benedict, a senior adviser to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which in January will unveil its latest assessment of the “doomsday clock” set since 2021 at 100 seconds to midnight.

Amid the focus on Ukraine, US intelligence believes North Korea is ready for a seventh nuclear test, Biden has effectively declared dead a deal on Iran’s contested nuclear work and tensions between India and Pakistan have remained at a low boil.

Benedict also faulted the Biden administration’s nuclear posture review which reserved the right for the United States to use nuclear weapons in “extreme circumstances”.

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“I think there’s been a kind of steady erosion of the ability to manage nuclear weapons,” she said.

UN experts estimated ahead of November talks in Egypt that the world was on track to warming of 2.1 to 2.9 degrees – but some outside analysts put the figure well higher, with greenhouse gas emissions in 2021 again hitting a record despite pushes to renewable energy.

Luke Kemp, a Cambridge University expert on existential risks, said the possibility of higher warming was drawing insufficient attention, which he blamed on the consensus culture of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and scientists’ fears of being branded alarmist.

“There has been a strong incentive to err on the side of least drama,” he said.

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“What we really need are more complex assessments of how risks would cascade around the world.”

Climate change could cause ripple effects on food, with multiple breadbasket regions failing, fuelling hunger and eventually political unrest and conflict.

Kemp warned against extrapolating from a single year or event. But a research paper he co-authored noted that even a two-degree temperature rise would put the Earth in territory uncharted since the Ice Age.

Using a medium-high scenario on emissions and population growth, it found that two billion people by 2070 could live in areas with a mean temperature of 29 degrees, straining water resources – including between India and Pakistan.

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The year, however, was not all grim. While China ended the year with a surge of Covid-19 deaths, vaccinations helped much of the world turn the page on virus, which the World Health Organization estimated in May contributed to the deaths of 14.9 million people in 2020 and 2021.

Surprising jaded observers, a December conference in Montreal on biodiversity produced a major deal to protect 30 per cent of the world’s land and seas, with China leading the way.

The world has seen previous warnings of worst-case scenarios, from Thomas Malthus predicting in the 18th century that food production would not keep up with population growth to the 1968 US bestseller The Population Bomb.

One of the most prominent current-day critics of pessimism is Harvard professor Steven Pinker, who has argued that violence has declined massively in the modern era.

Speaking after the Ukraine invasion, Pinker acknowledged Putin had brought back interstate war. But he said a failed invasion could also reinforce the positive trends.

Biden, in a Christmas address to Americans, acknowledged tough times but pointed to the decline in Covid and healthy employment rates.

“We’re surely making progress. Things are getting better,” Biden said.