Quakeland: On the Road to America’s Next Devastating Earthquake: Revelation 6

Quakeland: On the Road to America’s Next Devastating Earthquake

Roger BilhamQuakeland: New York and the Sixth Seal (Revelation 6:12)

Given recent seismic activity — political as well as geological — it’s perhaps unsurprising that two books on earthquakes have arrived this season. One is as elegant as the score of a Beethoven symphony; the other resembles a diary of conversations overheard during a rock concert. Both are interesting, and both relate recent history to a shaky future.

Journalist Kathryn Miles’s Quakeland is a litany of bad things that happen when you provoke Earth to release its invisible but ubiquitous store of seismic-strain energy, either by removing fluids (oil, water, gas) or by adding them in copious quantities (when extracting shale gas in hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, or when injecting contaminated water or building reservoirs). To complete the picture, she describes at length the bad things that happen during unprovoked natural earthquakes. As its subtitle hints, the book takes the form of a road trip to visit seismic disasters both past and potential, and seismologists and earthquake engineers who have first-hand knowledge of them. Their colourful personalities, opinions and prejudices tell a story of scientific discovery and engineering remedy.

Miles poses some important societal questions. Aside from human intervention potentially triggering a really damaging earthquake, what is it actually like to live in neighbourhoods jolted daily by magnitude 1–3 earthquakes, or the occasional magnitude 5? Are these bumps in the night acceptable? And how can industries that perturb the highly stressed rocks beneath our feet deny obvious cause and effect? In 2015, the Oklahoma Geological Survey conceded that a quadrupling of the rate of magnitude-3 or more earthquakes in recent years, coinciding with a rise in fracking, was unlikely to represent a natural process. Miles does not take sides, but it’s difficult for the reader not to.

She visits New York City, marvelling at subway tunnels and unreinforced masonry almost certainly scheduled for destruction by the next moderate earthquake in the vicinity. She considers the perils of nuclear-waste storage in Nevada and Texas, and ponders the risks to Idaho miners of rock bursts — spontaneous fracture of the working face when the restraints of many million years of confinement are mined away. She contemplates the ups and downs of the Yellowstone Caldera — North America’s very own mid-continent supervolcano — and its magnificently uncertain future. Miles also touches on geothermal power plants in southern California’s Salton Sea and elsewhere; the vast US network of crumbling bridges, dams and oil-storage farms; and the magnitude 7–9 earthquakes that could hit California and the Cascadia coastline of Oregon and Washington state this century. Amid all this doom, a new elementary school on the coast near Westport, Washington, vulnerable to inbound tsunamis, is offered as a note of optimism. With foresight and much persuasion from its head teacher, it was engineered to become an elevated safe haven.

Miles briefly discusses earthquake prediction and the perils of getting it wrong (embarrassment in New Madrid, Missouri, where a quake was predicted but never materialized; prison in L’Aquila, Italy, where scientists failed to foresee a devastating seismic event) and the successes of early-warning systems, with which electronic alerts can be issued ahead of damaging seismic waves. Yes, it’s a lot to digest, but most of the book obeys the laws of physics, and it is a engaging read. One just can’t help wishing that Miles’s road trips had taken her somewhere that wasn’t a disaster waiting to happen.

Catastrophic damage in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1964, caused by the second-largest earthquake in the global instrumental record.

In The Great Quake, journalist Henry Fountain provides us with a forthright and timely reminder of the startling historical consequences of North America’s largest known earthquake, which more than half a century ago devastated southern Alaska. With its epicentre in Prince William Sound, the 1964 quake reached magnitude 9.2, the second largest in the global instrumental record. It released more energy than either the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake or the 2011 Tohoku earthquake off Japan; and it generated almost as many pages of scientific commentary and description as aftershocks. Yet it has been forgotten by many.

The quake was scientifically important because it occurred at a time when plate tectonics was in transition from hypothesis to theory. Fountain expertly traces the theory’s historical development, and how the Alaska earthquake was pivotal in nailing down one of the most important predictions. The earthquake caused a fjordland region larger than England to subside, and a similarly huge region of islands offshore to rise by many metres; but its scientific implications were not obvious at the time. Eminent seismologists thought that a vertical fault had slipped, drowning forests and coastlines to its north and raising beaches and islands to its south. But this kind of fault should have reached the surface, and extended deep into Earth’s mantle. There was no geological evidence of a monster surface fault separating these two regions, nor any evidence for excessively deep aftershocks. The landslides and liquefied soils that collapsed houses, and the tsunami that severely damaged ports and infrastructure, offered no clues to the cause.

“Previous earthquakes provide clear guidance about present-day vulnerability.” The hero of The Great Quake is the geologist George Plafker, who painstakingly mapped the height reached by barnacles lifted out of the intertidal zone along shorelines raised by the earthquake, and documented the depths of drowned forests. He deduced that the region of subsidence was the surface manifestation of previously compressed rocks springing apart, driving parts of Alaska up and southwards over the Pacific Plate. His finding confirmed a prediction of plate tectonics, that the leading edge of the Pacific Plate plunged beneath the southern edge of Alaska along a gently dipping thrust fault. That observation, once fully appreciated, was applauded by the geophysics community.

Fountain tells this story through the testimony of survivors, engineers and scientists, interweaving it with the fascinating history of Alaska, from early discovery by Europeans to purchase from Russia by the United States in 1867, and its recent development. Were the quake to occur now, it is not difficult to envisage that with increased infrastructure and larger populations, the death toll and price tag would be two orders of magnitude larger than the 139 fatalities and US$300-million economic cost recorded in 1964.

What is clear from these two books is that seismicity on the North American continent is guaranteed to deliver surprises, along with unprecedented economic and human losses. Previous earthquakes provide clear guidance about the present-day vulnerability of US infrastructure and populations. Engineers and seismologists know how to mitigate the effects of future earthquakes (and, in mid-continent, would advise against the reckless injection of waste fluids known to trigger earthquakes). It is merely a matter of persuading city planners and politicians that if they are tempted to ignore the certainty of the continent’s seismic past, they should err on the side of caution when considering its seismic future.

How Famine Will Follow the First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

How Worldwide Famine Would Follow Even a “Limited” Nuclear War

A landmark study demands attention.

By Matt Bivens

YESTERDAY 7:15 AM

An automatic camera recorded an atomic bomb test explosion in the Marshall Islands in 1946. (Bettmann Archive / Getty Images)

The United States has a population of about 329 million people, is protected by two oceans, and grows food that feeds hundreds of millions around the world. We have a powerful military, peaceful borders with our neighbors, and a network of alliances. We would seem well-positioned to defend ourselves from the dangers of foreign war. Our fate surely thus rests in our own hands; the only question is whether we will be wise enough and lucky enough to chart a safe national course.

So finds a landmark study published in Nature Food this week. An international team led by scientists at Rutgers University modeled what happens to crop production worldwide after a minor or regional nuclear war. 

It would not bring about the dreaded “nuclear winter” that would follow a major nuclear war between Russia and the United States. But a regional or “limited” nuclear war would still bring “nuclear famine”—several years of abrupt global cooling and agricultural collapse.

“In a nuclear war, bombs targeted on cities and industrial areas would start firestorms, injecting large amounts of soot into the upper atmosphere, which would spread globally and rapidly cool the planet,” the researchers report. “Famine could result for a third of Earth…even from a war between India and Pakistan using less than 3% of the global nuclear arsenal.”

Lili Xia of Rutgers and her colleagues looked at how much sun-blocking soot would be generated by cities incinerated under various regional nuclear war scenarios. They considered how far global temperatures would fall as a result, what would happen to crop production, and, finally, how many would starve. 

Their findings: As horrific as the war zone itself might be, with India and Pakistan devastated and with tens of millions of immediate fatalities—more deaths in a few days or weeks than in all of the years of World War II—that historic tragedy would be dwarfed in the coming years by starvation from global crop failures. 

In fact, the researchers found, more than 2 billion people around the world could die of hunger after an India-Pakistan war. Again, this is a scenario that assumes the vast majority of nuclear weapons are never used. It’s a regional nuclear war. No one asks our permission or seeks our input. We just find out it happened somewhere from the news. And then the skies get dark, and the temperatures drop. For years.

The Rutgers-led team’s findings are the latest in a flurry of new studies modeling regional nuclear wars. International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War released a report this week (by me) summarizing some of the latest data—much of which has been building behind the scenes of the Covid-19 pandemic, and only now being appreciated . 

For example, a paper in 2020 led by Jonas Jägermeyr, a scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, looked at the same scenario of an India-Pakistan nuclear war, and found that it would cause abrupt global cooling of 1.8 degrees Celsius, five years of bad harvests, and “adverse consequences for global food security unmatched in modern history.”

A paper led by Brian Toon of the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and published in September 2019—right before the coronavirus vacuumed up all media and public attention—examined escalating scenarios of regional India-Pakistan wars. Toon and colleagues found the larger scenarios—again, “large” is oh-so-relative, since it would still involve less than one twentieth of world arsenals—would bring abrupt global cooling of 5.5–6.5 degrees Celsius.

For comparison, the last Ice Age, when our ancestors contended with wooly mammoths and saber tooth tigers, was about 6 degrees Celsius cooler than today.

The scenarios considered in recent studies often involve a hypothetical nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan—two nations who have fought recent wars, continue to have border skirmishes, and deploy nuclear weapons prominently in their military planning. But it does not necessarily matter where such a war happens. Whether cities and industrial areas are incinerated in the Middle East, on the Indian subcontinent, or in Central Europe, the soot rises into the same sky.

Societies around the world would take desperate measures to adapt to a darker, cooler planet. For example, livestock could be killed off en masse, both to feed humans in the first year and also to divert animal feed to human consumption; household food waste (around 20 percent on global average) could be reduced; unpalatable fish species could enter the diet; and international trade might be shut down, as hungry nations seek to prevent food from being exported. 

The Rutgers-led team behind the Nature Food study crunched the numbers for many of these mitigation measures as well. But once the food available in the world drops by one-fourth or half, people starve no matter how wisely they order their affairs. What’s more, the researchers are only modeling crop failures due to sun-blocking soot and the associated global cooling. Significantly, they do not consider the effects on available food or human health of radioactive fallout from the nuclear war; or of increased UV radiation from likely ozone damage; or of economic disruptions from any possible breakdown of supply chains or public order. So the model in Nature Food—which shows up to 200 million Americans starving to death in some regional India-Pakistan war scenarios—if anything may underestimate the devastation.

Russia and the United States control more than 90 percent of all nuclear weapons. But seven other nations are nuclear-armed: France, Great Britain, Israel, India, Pakistan, China and North Korea. 

Our national discussions of this situation often complacently assume the United States is safe because, with our massive arsenals, no one would dare attack us. But based on this new data, that asks the wrong question: Now it turns out the United States can be devastated if any two other nations attack each other, leaving us entirely out of it!

Pakistan or France may seem mere regional powers—but each is capable of starting their own local nuclear war, only to have it spill over across America’s skies, from sea to shining sea. For that matter, the power to destroy modern civilization is in the hands not just of nine national governments, but also of many lower-level individuals throughout military hierarchies. Consider that every commander of a US Ohio-class or a Russian Borei-class submarine has at his disposal firepower comparable to that of an entire nation such as Pakistan or France—and that there are 14 Ohio class subs and five Borei-class subs in service. 

There is one good thing for the United States. We are the nation that pioneered the nuclear weapon and the (deeply flawed) theory of nuclear war fighting; we hold the most powerful arsenal and the world’s mightiest military. There is no other nation better poised to captain fate—our own, and the world’s—because no one else could more effectively lead a rapid, verifiable, global stand-down and abolition of nuclear weapons. The only question is whether we will be wise enough, and lucky enough, to chart that safe course.

Matt BivensMatt Bivens is an emergency medicine physician practicing in Massachusetts and a national board member of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Bush and Cheney are Glad Kay is Dead: Revelation 13

David Kay
The Associated PressDavid Kay gives testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee in 2004.

David Kay, inspector who did not find nuclear weapons in Iraq, dies at 82

BY BRAD DRESS – 08/22/22 3:47 PM ET

David Kay, a weapons expert who famously led an inspection team into Iraq in 2003 to search for weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) and faced the ire of the Bush administration after he reported he did not find any nuclear arms or other WMDs, died on Aug. 13 at 82.

Kay died in Ocean View, Del., and the cause was cancer, according to an obituary written by his loved ones. The Washington Post first reported the news.

Before he traveled to Iraq in 2003, Kay served as a chief weapons inspector for the United Nations (U.N.) Special Commission from 1991 to 1992 and as an agent with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Kay led multiple expeditions into Iraq after the Persian Gulf War ended in 1991. He was tasked with determining if the Middle Eastern country was developing WMDs in violation of a U.N. agreement.

The weapons inspector found evidence of uranium enrichment processes, which are used to develop nuclear weapons, located a major assembly plant for the creation of nuclear arms and seized key documents about the Iraqi weapons program.

In one famous incident, during a sweep of Iraq in the 1990s, Kay was stuck in a parking lot for four days as a hostage after seizing documents from a building in Baghdad. Iraqi forces would not let him and his team walk out of the parking lot with the documents in hand.

In a 1999 interview with “PBS Frontline,” Kay recalled how he tried to “make the Iraqis more uncomfortable” than he was.

“It was dangerous, from our point of view, for us, but you forget, it was also dangerous for the Iraqis. Here they had a group of 43 inspectors stuck in a parking lot, not letting them go,” Kay said. “We kept trying to emphasize to them that they didn’t know how, and that it could be dangerous for them.”

The inspection team was eventually released after it used a satellite phone to communicate with the outside world, including media outlets such as CNN. The Iraqi soldiers grew concerned that military action could take place if they did not let the team go.

Kay told PBS that his work in Iraq in the ’90s was a huge milestone in holding nations accountable for violating peace accords.

“I think we were able to accomplish something that, even in retrospect, I’m still amazed at,” he said. “We were able to uncover a clandestine weapons program.”

But Kay is best known as the man who led a team to Iraq in 2003 to search for nuclear weapons and the development of WMDs — and finding no evidence of such activity.

The Bush administration had claimed ahead of its March 2003 invasion of Iraq that then-leader Saddam Hussein had violated the post-Gulf War U.N. agreement by developing nuclear weapons and other WMDs. In June 2003, Bush tasked the CIA with finding hard evidence of weapons in the country.

Given his experience, the CIA appointed Kay as the head of a 1,400-member task force known as the Iraq Survey Group. In January 2004, Kay submitted a report that determined Iraq did not have any such weapons in the country.

His findings rankled the CIA and the White House and spurred congressional investigations into U.S. intelligence prior to the Bush administration’s invasion.

In a 2011 interview with NPR, shortly after the U.S. announced it would pull troops out of Iraq for the first time since the 2001 invasion, Kay reflected on his controversial role in the war.

“What I miss most are the friendships that were shattered by that; just had staked too much of their career on there being weapons of mass destruction,” he said. “And not only didn’t we find them, we found they didn’t exist prior to the war.”National Archives says at least 700 pages of classified materials seized from Trump’s homeChildren enduring drought in Africa are ‘one disease away from catastrophe’: UNICEF

Kay was born in Houston. He graduated from the University of Texas and earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

He served with the Department of State and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in addition to his service as a weapons expert.

Kay also taught at universities and was a senior fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies. He won an IAEA Distinguished Service Award and a commendation medal from the secretary of State.

Antichrist calls Iraqi government for urgent investigation on Qattara shrine’s case

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr delivers a speech in the central Iraqi city of Najaf on June 3, 2022. (Photo: Qassem Al-Kaabi/AFP)
Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr delivers a speech in the central Iraqi city of Najaf on June 3, 2022. (Photo: Qassem Al-Kaabi/AFP)

Sadr calls Iraqi government for urgent investigation on Qattara shrine’s case

“The Kurdistan Region, with all its health institutions, is ready to provide all forms of support and assistance to our people in Holy Karbala,” said Prime Minister Barzani. 

 Dler S. Mohammed   2022/08/21 23:18

ERBIL (Kurdistan 24) – Muqtada al-Sadr, leader of the Sadrist Movement, called on the Iraqi government to start an urgent and serious investigation into the case of the Qattara al-Imam Ali shrine in Karbala holy city.

“This time, corruption rudely reached places of worship,” Sadr tweeted on Sunday. “After presenting our condolences to the victims’ families, we call the government to start an urgent and serious investigation to uncover the truth, so the corruption doesn’t reach the mosques as it did to the state’s ministries and institutions.”

Four bodies have so far been pulled out from under the rubbles after a landslide hit the Qattara Shiite shrine in Iraq’s central city of Karbala, Iraqi civil defense teams said on Sunday as the search effort continues.

Dozens of civilians who had visited the holy site for religious practices were trapped under rubble.  

“With deep sadness, we received the news of the landslide on the shrine of Imam Ali (peace be upon him), which resulted in deaths, injuries, and others under the rubble,” Kurdistan Region Prime Minister Masrour Barzani tweeted on Sunday.

The Russian Horn May Nuke Ukraine

‘Ailing’ and ‘cornered’ Putin is ‘driven to extremes’ of ‘using nuclear weapons’ or admitting defeat

By Will Stewart for MailOnline 11:58 EDT 21 Aug 2022, updated 13:30 EDT 21 Aug 2022

An ailing Vladimir is flailing over his war strategy, torn between using and accepting defeat and handing back Ukrainian regions invaded by his forces, a Telegram channel claims.

Amid fresh concerns over his health, his security officials have bluntly told the warmonger president that he has run out of ‘good’ options.

This comes as the death toll in the Russian armed forces plus separatist fighters and pro-Putin private armies has reached almost 65,000, said General SVR Telegram channel, an opposition source offering ‘insider’ information which the Kremlin is ‘seeking to shut down’.

There is ‘despondency’ among Putin’s senior entourage that he had privately raised the ‘extreme’ option with ‘top aides” of a ‘goodwill’ to cede newly invaded territories to .

Security officials have allegedly told Vladimir Putin that he has run out of 'good' options after the death toll in the Russian armed forces is said to have reached almost 65,000
Security officials have allegedly told Vladimir Putin that he has run out of ‘good’ options after the death toll in the Russian armed forces is said to have reached almost 65,000 
Recent explosions deep behind Russia's lines in Crimea have had a major psychological effect on Moscow's leadership, with its invasion of Ukraine at 'near operational standstill', Western officials have said. Pictured: Explosions are seen on Crimea in the distance on August 9
Recent explosions deep behind Russia’s lines in Crimea have had a major psychological effect on Moscow’s leadership, with its invasion of Ukraine at ‘near operational standstill’, Western officials have said. Pictured: Explosions are seen on Crimea in the distance on August 9 
More than half of the Russian navy's Black Sea Fleet combat jets were put out of action in blasts last week at the Russian-operated Saky military airfield in western Crimea, an area Moscow previously considered secure, according to Britain's Ministry of Defence (MoD)
More than half of the Russian navy’s Black Sea Fleet combat jets were put out of action in blasts last week at the Russian-operated Saky military airfield in western Crimea, an area Moscow previously considered secure, according to Britain’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) 

At the same time, there is a warning from his defence chiefs that a Ukrainian military counter strike is likely to be ‘effective’.

Such an outcome would threaten his presidency, being seen as a humbling, crushing defeat.

But Putin’s leading officials are also said to be braced for a ‘sharp deterioration’ in his medical condition.

‘With a high degree of probability, we can say that soon the president will not be able to personally hold meetings and participate in large events,’ said the channel, which has long asserted the he suffers from cancer and other serious medical problems.

Putin’s absence will be explained as due to a return of the Covid pandemic, it was alleged.

Body doubles ‘have also recently been used quite often’, it alleged without specifying where or when.

In recent meetings with his security and defence aides, claimed General SVR, ‘various options were discussed, from the possibility of mobilising and using tactical nuclear weapons, to opening a second front in a third country, and, finally, to “gestures of good will” with the return of the occupied territories of Kherson, Zaporizhzhia and Kharkiv regions to Ukraine.’

A second front might involve an invasion of northern Kazakhstan, a region with many ethnic Russians, as a distraction to hide the ignominy of his failings in Ukraine.

He has so far rejected a full mobilisation, another option, amid fears it would trigger mass mutiny.

But an ‘extreme’ course was also discussed involving the return of land in the Luhansk and Donetsk ‘people’s republic’s’ won during the almost six-month war, in addition to land in Kherson, Zaporizhzhia and Kharkiv, stated the channel.

Ukraine says Russia has told staff working at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant not to come to work today amid fears of a 'major provocation' there (file image)
Ukraine says Russia has told staff working at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant not to come to work today amid fears of a ‘major provocation’ there (file image) 
Ukraine has begun rehearsing for a nuclear disaster at Zaporizhzhia amid explosions around the nearby Russian-occupied nuclear power plant, that it says are being caused by Moscow's troops
Ukraine has begun rehearsing for a nuclear disaster at Zaporizhzhia amid explosions around the nearby Russian-occupied nuclear power plant, that it says are being caused by Moscow’s troops 

Ukraine’s best-guess in case of nuclear disaster in Zaporizhzhia

The discussion of the ‘extreme’ options in the presence and at the initiative of the President led many in his war team to ‘despondency’.

‘Without exception, all of Putin’s interlocutors realised that the president simply does not have ‘good’ options for solving urgent and upcoming problems at the front.’

Such a move would amount to the ‘beginning of the end’ for his rule and the regime he heads.

The report also argued that military chiefs blame Putin for tactics which have led them to such heavy loses.

‘Almost the entire military leadership of Russia lays the blame for both the unsuccessful start and, in general, the course of the military operation, and the huge losses of manpower and weapons, precisely on President Vladimir Putin,’ said the channel.

Yet the military leadership ‘has no doubt that they will be made guilty for all the failures and problems at the front’.

Vladimir Putin is pictured today with Kazakh president Kassym-Jomart Tokayev. Russian generals allegedly discussed opening a second front might involving an invasion of northern Kazakhstan, a region with many ethnic Russians, as a distraction to hide the failings in Ukraine
Vladimir Putin is pictured today with Kazakh president Kassym-Jomart Tokayev. Russian generals allegedly discussed opening a second front might involving an invasion of northern Kazakhstan, a region with many ethnic Russians, as a distraction to hide the failings in Ukraine 

Close Putin crony, hardliner Nikolai Patrushev, his leading security advisor and a key proponent of the war, urged Putin ‘to find a way out of the current situation’.

Failure to do so would cause deeper problems if there was a successful counteroffensive by Ukraine.

The channel said Putin had been told the Russian death toll from his war now tops 60,400, including 48,745 from the regular forces, 2,366 from the country’s national guard, and 13,494 from Wagner and other private military companies.

Among the dead are at least a dozen generals and more than 100 colonels and lieutenant colonels.

Among the latest to perish was Lt-Col Ruslan Mukhametkhanov, 43, a father of two girls.

General SVR said the Kremlin is pressuring messenger outlet Telegram to axe it after a string of revelations.

The channel has claimed that Putin is suffering from serious illnesses including cancer, Parkinson’s disease and a schizoaffective disorder.

This channel is reportedly authored by an exiled Kremlin lieutenant-general, who is known by the alias Viktor Mikhailovich.

It claims insider knowledge despite being hostile to Putin.

A Ukrainian solder smokes a cigarette somewhere on the frontlines in Zaporzhzhia province, amid  campaign to force Russia out of the south of the country
A Ukrainian solder smokes a cigarette somewhere on the frontlines in Zaporzhzhia province, amid  campaign to force Russia out of the south of the country 
Ukrainian service members observe an area at a position near a frontline, amid Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Zaporizhzhia province
Ukrainian service members observe an area at a position near a frontline, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues, in Zaporizhzhia province 

He was travelling on a highway near the village of Bolshiye Vyazyomy just outside the capital on Saturday night — but decided to travel in a different car to his daughter, avoiding death only by chance.

Vladimir Putin’s closest supporters have demanded vengeance on Ukraine over the ‘assassination’ of Dugina, daughter of the Russian leader’s spiritual guru, who died in his stead.

A distressing video from Baza media shows the bereft father – known as Putin’s ‘Rasputin’ – at the scene of the explosion.

The car is seen as a fireball as emergency services sirens wail. Reports said she died on the spot.

But her father – seen as the brains behind Putin’s interference in Ukraine from 2014 – was intended to be in the Toyota Land Cruiser Prado which was hit, but the former professor apparently switched cars at the last minute.

The explosion took place as Ms Dugina was returning from a cultural festival she had attended with her father. 

Dugina was a political analyst and editor of pro-Putin journal United World International and a joint author of a book on Putin’s war in Ukraine.

Her father is the author of an extreme rightwing view of Russia’s role in the world which held an appeal to Putin.

The pair were pictured together at a pro-Putin public event shortly before she was slain.

Andrey Krasnov, the head of the Russian Horizon social movement and a close friend of the dead woman, said: ‘I knew Darya personally.

‘This was the father’s vehicle. Darya… took his car today, while Alexander went in a different way. He returned, and he was at the site of the tragedy.

‘As far as I understand, Alexander or probably both of them were the target.’

Putin’s closest aide holds head in hands after ‘bomb kills daughter’

Alexander Dugin - father of 30-year-old Darya Dugina who died in the car explosion late on 20 August 2022 in Moscow region - is shown at the explosion site
Alexander Dugin – father of 30-year-old Darya Dugina who died in the car explosion late on 20 August 2022 in Moscow region – is shown at the explosion site 
Charred jeep where Darya Dugina, 30, was killed by an explosion on 20 August
Charred jeep where Darya Dugina, 30, was killed by an explosion on 20 August 
30-year-old Darya Dugina died in the car explosion late on 20 August 2022 in Moscow region
30-year-old Darya Dugina died in the car explosion late on 20 August 2022 in Moscow region 
Denis Pushilin, head of the breakaway Donetsk People's Republic in eastern Ukraine, branded the authors of the 'attack' 'vile villains'. (Pictured: Darya and Alexander Dugin)
Denis Pushilin, head of the breakaway Donetsk People’s Republic in eastern Ukraine, branded the authors of the ‘attack’ ‘vile villains’. (Pictured: Darya and Alexander Dugin) 
Investigators work at the site of a suspected car bomb attack that killed Darya Dugina, daughter of ultra-nationalist Russian ideologue Alexander Dugin, in the Moscow region, Russia August 21
Investigators work at the site of a suspected car bomb attack that killed Darya Dugina, daughter of ultra-nationalist Russian ideologue Alexander Dugin, in the Moscow region, Russia August 21 
Investigators are pictured inspecting the aftermath of the car bomb in Moscow. Much of the wreckage where Darya Dugina was killed has been cleared away to be used as evidence.
Investigators are pictured inspecting the aftermath of the car bomb in Moscow. Much of the wreckage where Darya Dugina was killed has been cleared away to be used as evidence. 
The car bombing is believed to have taken place in Bolshiye Vyazyomy, on the outskirts of Moscow
The car bombing is believed to have taken place in Bolshiye Vyazyomy, on the outskirts of Moscow 

Russian ultra-right ideologue Alexander Dugin is responsible for shaping the world view of Putin’s inner circle. He has called for Ukrainians to be killed and strongly pushed Russia to invade for decades.

In his youth, Dugin emerged as a leader of the notorious anti-Semitic Russian nationalist organisation, Pamyat.

He founded his own publishing house after the fall of the USSR, going on to win university positions for his writings.

Dugin believes that the Russian Orthodox Church was destined to rule as an empire over all of Europe and Asia — uniting all the Russian-speaking peoples into a single state.

He laid out his plan for achieving this aim in his 1997 book Foundations of Geopolitics, a text which still has significant influence within Russian elites and has even been used as a textbook by the Russian military.

The Russian professor formed the ‘Eurasia Party’ in 2001, named after the hypothetical state, which also appears in George Orwell’s novel 1984.

His novel calls for a Russian empire stretching from Dublin to Vladivostok, even calling for parts of China to be conquered. 

Dugin was dismissed from his position as head of the Department of Sociology of International Relations at Moscow University after arguing for ‘people’s republics’ on the territory of Ukraine.

Seven years later, his position would become a reality after the Kremlin annexed the Donetsk People’s Republic and the Luhansk People’s Republic out of Ukraine’s occupied eastern territories. 

Dugin called for the annexation of Crimea as far back as 2008, during Russia’s war with Georgia.

He travelled to the disputed region of South Ossetia, where he was photographed with a rocket launcher.

He was also involved with coordinating separatist movements in Ukraine during the 2014 occupation, for which the US sanctioned him.

The political scientist claims he also played a key role in reconciling the relationship between Russia and Turkey in 2015 after a Russian warplane was shot down on the Syrian border.

Dugin also developed links with far-right and far-left political parties in the European Union, attempting to influence EU policy on Ukraine and Russia.

There is no direct evidence Ukraine or its agents were involved in the Moscow attack, but senior pro-Putin war supporters were quick to demand an all out attack on Kyiv over the alleged assassination.

Margarita Simonyan, head of RT ‘propaganda’ network, posted on Telegram: ‘Decision-making centres! Decision-making centres!! Decision-making centres!!!’

Her call echoes a demand from hardliners loyal to Putin for him to wreak havoc with massive missile strikes on central Kyiv.

Propaganda journalist Maxim Kononenko messaged: ‘The address of the main building of the SBU [Ukrainian secret services]: Volodymyrska 33, Kyiv. I’m going to try to sleep now, and when I wake up, I hope to read on the news that it was f****** bombed along with its basements.’

There were also warnings that other pro-Putin propagandists could be in danger.

Denis Pushilin, the head of the Donetsk People’s Republic [DPR], a pro-Moscow puppet state in eastern Ukraine, posted: ‘The terrorists of the Ukrainian regime, trying to eliminate Alexander Dugin blew up his daughter…in a car. Blessed memory of Daria, she is a real Russian girl.’

He directly blamed ‘terrorists of the Ukrainian regime’.

Dugina was described as ‘a young, smart, beautiful and incredibly talented and sympathetic woman’.

While he has no formal role in government, Dugin, a far-Right occult writer who used to edit the staunchly pro-Putin Tsargrad TV network, is regarded as the Russian warmonger’s ‘guru advisor’ and reportedly exerts heavy influence over him. 

He is credited with giving new life to the term Novorossiya (New Russia), which was adopted by Putin to justify his annexation of Crimea in 2014.

Dugin has long dreamed of an expansionist Russia, advocating for Russian rule ‘from Dublin to Vladisvostok’ in his 1997 book Foundations of Geopolitics. He once said not taking back control of Ukraine would be ‘an enormous danger for all of Eurasia’ – before he was sanctioned by the US in 2015 after allegedly recruiting fighters for Russia-backed forces in the country. 

His daughter Darya was also sanctioned by the US Treasury after she became chief editor of the United World International (UWI) website – which was owned by Yevgeny Prigozhin, who is suspected of interfering in the 2016 election between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

News of Alexander Dugin’s attempted assassination comes after a kamikaze drone strike hit Russia’s Navy headquarters in Crimea and sparked a huge explosion on Saturday, in another suspected Ukrainian raid.

Smoke was seen billowing through the air following the attack, which came despite frantic attempts from Putin’s forces to shoot down the UAV, as seen in a video where repetitive gunfire is heard.

The naval HQ suffered a direct hit, said reports while terrified Russian tourists fled the popular summer peninsula. 

Car belonging to Putin aide’s daughter on fire after explosion

The IAEA Slams Iran over ‘hidden’ uranium but Who Cares?

UN nuclear watchdog slams Iran over ‘hidden’ uranium 

UN nuclear watchdog slams Iran over ‘hidden’ uranium

Updated 09 June 2022 

Arab News  

June 08, 202216:15

VIENNA/JEDDAH: In a stinging rebuke, the UN atomic watchdog on Wednesday adopted a resolution formally criticizing Tehran for its failure to cooperate with inspectors monitoring Iran’s nuclear program.

The critical resolution at the International Atomic Energy Agency governors’ meeting in Vienna threatened to raise tension over Iran’s nuclear threat to the boiling point. It rebuked Iran for failing to provide “credible information” about unexplained fissile uranium particles discovered at three undeclared nuclear development sites.

US Ambassador Laura Holgate urged Tehran to cooperate with UN inspectors and said the aim of the censure motion was to hold Iran accountable. “Restricting IAEA acess and attempts to paint the IAEA as politicized for simply doing its job will serve no purpose,” she said.

Laura Holgate, US Ambassador to the UN’s Vienna office and to the IAEA, attends IAEA Board of Governors meeting on June 06, 2022. (AFP)

Only two countries on the agency’s 35-nation board of governors, Russia and China, opposed Wednesday’s resolution; 30 voted in favor and three abstained. The motion brought by the United States, Britain, France and Germany.

The text says the board “expresses profound concern” that the uranium traces remain unexplained due to insufficient cooperation by Iran, and calls on Tehran to engage with the watchdog “without delay.”

Before the resolution was passed, Iran said it had turned off two cameras monitoring its nuclear program. Tehran deactivated two of the IAEA’s online monitors that observe the enrichment of uranium gas through piping at enrichment facilities. The move makes it even more difficult for inspectors to monitor Tehran’s nuclear program. Experts have warned that Iran now has enough uranium enriched close to weapons-grade levels to pursue an atomic bomb if it chooses to do so.

Iran’s Bushehr nuclear power plant. Iran now has enough uranium enriched close to weapons-grade levels to pursue an atomic bomb if it chooses to do so, say monitors. (AFP file photo)

Building a nuclear bomb would still take Iran more time if it pursued a weapon, analysts say, though they warn that Tehran’s advances make the program more dangerous.

Talks in Vienna aimed at reviving the 2015 nuclear deal, which curbed Iran’s nuclear program in return for the lifting of economic sanctions, have been stalled since March.

France, Germany and the UK warned that the latest moves by Tehran were “further reducing the time Iran would take to break out towards a first nuclear weapon, and fueling distrust as to Iran’s intentions.”

They said: “The IAEA has been without crucial access to data on centrifuge and component manufacturing for a year and half now. This means that neither the agency, nor the international community, know how many centrifuges Iran has in its inventory, how many were built, and where they may be located.”

The countries urged Iran “to stop escalating its nuclear program and to urgently conclude the deal that is on the table.”

Israel hailed the resolution chiding Iran. 

“This is a significant resolution that exposes Iran’s true face,” Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said in a statement, adding that IAEA members had “worked together with the aim of arresting and preventing Iran’s attainment of nuclear weaponry.”

“If Iran continues with its activities, major countries should bring the Iranian issue back to the Security Council,” he added.

(With Agencies)

Israel Detains 375 Outside the Temple Walls: Revelation 11

Report: Israeli occupation detained 375 Palestinians in July

Aug 22, 2022

The Israeli occupation authorities have detained 375 Palestinian citizens over the past month, according to Palestinian prisoners’ rights groups.

In a joint statement issued by the Commission of Detainees and Ex-Detainees Affairs, the Palestinian Prisoners Club, Addameer, the Wadi Hilweh Information Centre, the advocacy groups noted that 28 children and two women were among those detained by Israeli occupation forces last month.

In July, the Israeli occupation authorities issued 191 administrative detention orders against Palestinians, 65 of which were issued for the first time while the rest of them were issued to renew the detention of Palestinians without charge or trail.

According to the report, the Israeli occupation is now incarcerating 4,550 Palestinian detainees, including 27 female detainees, 175 minors, and 670 administrative detainees.  

The groups explained that Israeli occupation forces have used various methods of intimidation, including threats, beatings, assaults, damaging property, and field interrogations, against Palestinian detainees and their families during the detention campaigns. 

The Israeli occupation authorities adopts a policy of collective punishment against the Palestinian people and carry out raids on Palestinian villages and towns and large-scale detention campaigns across the occupied West Bank and Jerusalem.