New York Earthquake: City of the Sixth Seal (Revelation 6:12)

New York earthquake: City at risk of ‚dangerous shaking from far away‘
Joshua Nevett
Published 30th April 2018
SOME of New York City’s tallest skyscrapers are at risk of being shaken by seismic waves triggered by powerful earthquakes from miles outside the city, a natural disaster expert has warned.
Researchers believe that a powerful earthquake, magnitude 5 or greater, could cause significant damage to large swathes of NYC, a densely populated area dominated by tall buildings.
A series of large fault lines that run underneath NYC’s five boroughs, Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx and Staten Island, are capable of triggering large earthquakes.
Some experts have suggested that NYC is susceptible to at least a magnitude 5 earthquake once every 100 years.
The last major earthquake measuring over magnitude 5.0 struck NYC in 1884 – meaning another one of equal size is “overdue” by 34 years, according their prediction model.
Natural disaster researcher Simon Day, of University College London, agrees with the conclusion that NYC may be more at risk from earthquakes than is usually thought.
EARTHQUAKE RISK: New York is susceptible to seismic shaking from far-away tremors
But the idea of NYC being “overdue” for an earthquake is “invalid”, not least because the “very large number of faults” in the city have individually low rates of activity, he said.
The model that predicts strong earthquakes based on timescale and stress build-up on a given fault has been “discredited”, he said.
What scientists should be focusing on, he said, is the threat of large and potentially destructive earthquakes from “much greater distances”.
The dangerous effects of powerful earthquakes from further away should be an “important feature” of any seismic risk assessment of NYC, Dr Day said.

GETTY
THE BIG APPLE: An aerial view of Lower Manhattan at dusk in New York City

USGS
RISK: A seismic hazard map of New York produced by USGS
“New York is susceptible to seismic shaking from earthquakes at much greater distances” Dr Simon Day, natural disaster researcher
This is because the bedrock underneath parts of NYC, including Long Island and Staten Island, cannot effectively absorb the seismic waves produced by earthquakes.
“An important feature of the central and eastern United States is, because the crust there is old and cold, and contains few recent fractures that can absorb seismic waves, the rate of seismic reduction is low.
Central regions of NYC, including Manhattan, are built upon solid granite bedrock; therefore the amplification of seismic waves that can shake buildings is low.
But more peripheral areas, such as Staten Island and Long Island, are formed by weak sediments, meaning seismic hazard in these areas is “very likely to be higher”, Dr Day said.
“Thus, like other cities in the eastern US, New York is susceptible to seismic shaking from earthquakes at much greater distances than is the case for cities on plate boundaries such as Tokyo or San Francisco, where the crustal rocks are more fractured and absorb seismic waves more efficiently over long distances,” Dr Day said.
In the event of a large earthquake, dozens of skyscrapers, including Chrysler Building, the Woolworth Building and 40 Wall Street, could be at risk of shaking.
“The felt shaking in New York from the Virginia earthquake in 2011 is one example,” Dr Day said.
On that occasion, a magnitude 5.8 earthquake centered 340 miles south of New York sent thousands of people running out of swaying office buildings.

USGS
FISSURES: Fault lines in New York City have low rates of activity, Dr Day said
NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city was “lucky to avoid any major harm” as a result of the quake, whose epicenter was near Louisa, Virginia, about 40 miles from Richmond.
“But an even more impressive one is the felt shaking from the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes in the central Mississippi valley, which was felt in many places across a region, including cities as far apart as Detroit, Washington DC and New Orleans, and in a few places even further afield including,” Dr Day added.
“So, if one was to attempt to do a proper seismic hazard assessment for NYC, one would have to include potential earthquake sources over a wide region, including at least the Appalachian mountains to the southwest and the St Lawrence valley to the north and east.”

Small earthquakes before the sixth seal: Revelation 6

Small earthquake reported in Genesee County

Marcia Greenwood

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

A minor earthquake shook an area of Genesee County earlier this week.

The magnitude-1.2 temblor, the epicenter of which was a little less than 4 miles northwest of Le Roy, struck at 2:37 a.m. Monday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

It occurred about 3 miles beneath the Earth’s surface, the agency reported.

A 1.2-magnitude earthquake usually is not felt and does no damage, and none was reported in this case.

Earthquakes in New York

Earthquakes in New York state are not uncommon.

The state’s largest quake was reported Sept. 5, 1944. Registering a magnitude of 5.8, its epicenter was near Massena, St. Lawrence County. But it was felt from Canada to Maryland and Indiana to Maine and did $2 million in damage in Massena, New York, and Cornwall, Ontario.

It also shook homes in the Rochester area, and some residents who called authorities, but caused no significant damage here. 

A magnitude-5.1 quake centered 45 miles northwest of Ottawa, Canada, caused a rumble in Rochester May 17, 2003.

Chatter on Twitter and other social networks indicated it was felt all over the region.

The city of Rochester’s 911 dispatch center received a handful of calls in the half hour after the earthquake, none of which were for injuries.

Reporter Marcia Greenwood covers general assignments. Send story tips to mgreenwo@rocheste.gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter @MarciaGreenwood.

Antichrist rejects results of national dialogue

Iraq's Sadrist movement rejects results of national dialogue

Iraq’s Sadrist movement rejects results of national dialogue

BAGHDAD 

The Sadrist movement in Iraq on Thursday rejected the results of a national dialogue meeting. 

The movement led by Shia cleric Muqtada Al-Sadr refused to participate in the talks that were called by Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi.

The Wednesday’s session was attended by UN envoy to Iraq Jeanine Plasschaert to find a solution to the ongoing political crisis which has hindered the formation of a new government.

Salih Muhammad al-Iraqi, a leading member of the movement, accused most of the attendees of seeking to remain in power.

“This secret meeting of yours does not concern us with anything,” and “the people do not want people to do anything but to step aside,” he said in a statement.

The meeting urged the movement to engage in talks to set mechanisms for a comprehensive solution.

It also encouraged proceeding with talks to lay down a legal and constitutional road map to address the crisis, and stop all forms of field, media or political escalation.

Tension flared in Iraq in recent days following the nomination of Mohammed Shia al-Sudani as the new prime minister by the Coordination Framework, a coalition of groups close to Iran.

The move triggered mass protests from supporters of al-Sadr, who called for the dissolution of parliament and early elections.

Last June, 73 lawmakers of al-Sadr’s movement resigned from the 329-seat parliament after failing to form a “national majority” government, as the Coordination Framework hampered the Cabinet formation.

Iraq has been in a political deadlock for nine months following general elections last October, which has since failed to agree on a new government between rival parties.

*Writing by Mahmoud BarakatAnadolu Agency website contains only a portion of the news stories offered to subscribers in the AA News Broadcasting System (HAS), and in summarized form. Please contact us for subscription options.

What Will Happen With The First Nuclear War: Revelation 8

What would happen if there was a nuclear war?

August 17, 2022

A full-scale nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia would see global food systems obliterated and over 5 billion people die of hunger

A global study led by Rutgers climate scientists estimates post-conflict crop production.

Lead author Lili Xia, an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers, and co-author Alan Robock, a distinguished Professor of climate science in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University have built upon past research to determine what would happen if there was a nuclear war.

We must prevent a nuclear war from ever happening

“The data tell us one thing: We must prevent a nuclear war from ever happening,” comments Robock.

Xia, Robock and colleagues have calculated how much sun-blocking soot could be ignited, as a result of nuclear weapons. The researchers determined soot dispersal for a variety of war scenarios – from smaller India-Pakistan wars to a large U.S.-Russia war. They based the destruction on the size of each country’s nuclear arsenal.

So, what would happen if there was a nuclear war?

Even under the smallest nuclear scenario, say a localised war between India and Pakistan, the destruction would be immense. The global average caloric production would decrease by 7% within five years of the conflict.

Global average caloric production would decrease by about 90%

The team also tested what would happen in the event of U.S. Russia nuclear conflict. In this instance, global average caloric production would decrease by about 90% three to four years after the fighting.

Graph illustrating 'The global averaged calorie intake two years after a potential nuclear war.'
The global averaged calorie intake two years after a potential nuclear war.

Severe crop declines in mid-high latitude nations

Crop declines would be the most severe in the mid-high latitude nations. This includes major exporting countries such as Russia and the U.S.

Declining crops could lead to export restrictions and cause severe disruptions in places dependent on imports such as Africa and the Middle East.

The research team predicted that these changes would induce a catastrophic disruption of global food markets.

In fact, a 7% global decline in crop yield might not sound like much, but its impact would be astronomical. It would exceed the largest anomaly ever recorded since the beginning of Food and Agricultural Organization observational records in 1961.

And under the largest war scenario – a war between the U.S. and Russia – more than 75% of the planet would be starving within two years.

The team considered whether using crops fed to livestock as human food or reducing food waste could offset caloric losses in the immediate aftermath of a nuclear war, but concluded that the savings were minimal under the large injection scenarios.

“Future work will bring even more granularity to the crop models,” Xia said.

The ozone layer would be destroyed by the heating of the stratosphere

“For instance, the ozone layer would be destroyed by the heating of the stratosphere, producing more ultraviolet radiation at the surface, and we need to understand that impact on food supplies.”

Nuclear weapons must be banned

Robock attests that researchers already know how dangerous a nuclear war would be. A nuclear attack of any size would obliterate global food systems and kill billions of people in the process.

The only solution, is to ban nuclear weapons, explains the professor: “If nuclear weapons exist, they can be used, and the world has come close to nuclear war several times.

Banning nuclear weapons is the only long-term solution

“Banning nuclear weapons is the only long-term solution. The five-year-old UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons has been ratified by 66 nations, but none of the nine nuclear states.

“Our work makes clear that it is time for those nine states to listen to science and the rest of the world and sign this treaty.”

Iraq holds dialogue to end political impasse amid Antichrist’s boycott

Supporters of Iraqi Shiite leader Muqtada Al-Sadr during a protest in Baghdad, Iraq on 30 July 2022 [Murtadha Al-Sudani/Anadolu Agency]

Iraq holds dialogue to end political impasse amid Sadr’s boycott

August 16, 2022

Supporters of Iraqi Shiite leader Muqtada Al-Sadr during a protest in Baghdad, Iraq on 30 July 2022 [Murtadha Al-Sudani/Anadolu Agency]

August 17, 2022 at 2:29 pm 

Leaders of Iraqi political parties launched a national dialogue on Wednesday in an attempt to resolve the country’s political crisis, amid a boycott by influential Shia cleric, Muqtada Al-Sadr, Anadolu News Agency reports.

In a statement, Sadr’s Movement said it will not participate in the dialogue, called by Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi.

Wednesday’s session of dialogue was attended by UN envoy to Iraq, Jeanine Plasschaert.

Tension flared up in Iraq in recent days following the nomination of Mohammed Shia Al-Sudani as a new prime minister by the Coordination Framework, a coalition of groups close to Iran.

The move triggered mass protests from supporters of Al-Sadr, who called for the dissolution of the Iraqi Parliament and holding early elections.

Last June, 73 lawmakers of Al-Sadr’s movement resigned from the 329-seat Parliament after failing to form a “national majority” government, as the Coordination Framework hampered the Cabinet formation.

Iraq has been in a political deadlock for nine months following the country’s general elections last October which failed, since then, to agree on a new government between the rival parties.

China Prepares for WW3

CHINA is set to pour thousands of troops into Russia to stage huge war games as tensions with other countries hit boiling point.

It comes amid fears Russia and China’s leaders Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping are plotting for World War 3 to break out with the West.

Thousands of Chinese soldiers are set to take part in war games in Russia
Thousands of Chinese soldiers are set to take part in war games in RussiaCredit: Getty Images – Getty
Putin has made a series of chilling threats to the West
Putin has made a series of chilling threats to the WestCredit: AFP

Both countries have made repeated chilling threats to blast the UK and US as tensions simmer over Ukraine and Taiwan.

Just this month, China extended its largest-ever exercises around Taiwan beyond the four days originally scheduled in retaliation over Nancy Pelosi’s visit – including rehearsing sinking US submarines.

The country had also bragged about its ability to sink US aircraft carriers using hypersonic missiles.

Meanwhile, Russia has issued a string of threats to the West during its invasion of Ukraine.

One of Putin’s cronies previously boasted Moscow’s Satan-2 nuke can demolish “half of the US coast”.

In another warning, Russian state TV said Britain could be bombed “back to the stone age” in ten minutes using Putin’s “unstoppable” 7,000mph hypersonic nuke missiles.

But China’s ministry yesterday insisted Beijing’s participation in the latest joint exercises was “unrelated to the current international and regional situation”.

Last month, Moscow announced plans to hold exercises from August 30 to September 5, even as it wages a costly war in Ukraine.

China’s ministry said: “The aim is to deepen practical and friendly cooperation with the armies of participating countries, enhance the level of strategic collaboration among the participating parties, and strengthen the ability to respond to various security threats.”

Under Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Russian counterpart Putin, Beijing and Moscow have grown increasingly close.

A year ago, Russia and China held joint military exercises in north-central China involving more than 10,000 troops.

In October, Russia and China held joint naval drills in the Sea of Japan.

Days later, Russian and Chinese warships held their first joint patrols in the western Pacific.

Shortly before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Beijing and Moscow announced a “no limits” partnership.

It comes as Putin also cozies up to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Putin has written to the tyrant to form a pact to unite the pariah nations against the “hostile” West.

The concerning kinship has stoked fear among security agencies who fear their alliance could result in disastrous consequences

Antichrist says deadlock will continue if demands not met

Supporters of Iraqi Shiite cleric Moqtada Al Sadr outside the Iraqi parliament building in Baghdad on August 16. AFP
Supporters of Iraqi Shiite cleric Moqtada Al Sadr outside the Iraqi parliament building in Baghdad on August 16. AFP

Political stalemate can end by re-election and drafting of new constitution

Mina Aldroubi

Aug 17, 2022

Iraq’s powerful cleric Moqtada Al Sadr is demanding a rewrite of the constitution, abolishing the quota system and demanding that foreign powers leave the country in order for deadlock to ease, a close aide told The National.

Baghdad’s heavily fortified Green Zone was stormed by Mr Al Sadr’s supporters last month who occupied the parliament building and staged an ongoing sit-in protest. They are demanding an overhaul of the political system and to oust the country’s elites, whom they believe are corrupt.

The sit-in has made it impossible for politicians to convene and proceed with the formation of a new government following elections last October.

According to Sayed Moqtada Al Sadr (and those close to him) this is going to be the last chance for political players in Iraq as they need to urgently address the problems and all the mistakes they have committed so far since 2003,” Dhiaa Al Asadi, an Iraqi academic and former top politician in Mr Al Sadr’s political movement told The National.

Ali Al Safi (left), 35, travelled from the southern province of Thi Qar to serve the protesters with food.  All photos: Sinan Mahmoud/The National
Mohammed Jassim Saad, 60, signs the lawsuit to be sent to the Supreme Federal Court in which he demands that parliament is dissolved and early elections are held.
Three-wheeled rickshaws, known as tuk-tuks, shuttle followers of Shiite cleric Moqtada Al Sadr to and from the parliament building.
Packs of bottled water and food are stacked outside the parliament building, sent by volunteers for the protesters.
The sit-in outside the parliament is the latest chapter in Iraq’s 10-month political deadlock over forming the new government since elections in October.
Murtadha Riyadh, 19, splashes cold water on his face to beat the heat outside the tent he and others sleep in.
Caps are up for grabs outside the parliament.
Sheep and cows are tied up outside the parliament to feed the protesters.
A lorry full of air coolers outside the parliament for the protesters.
A protester sits outside the parliament next to an announcement that urges followers of Mr Al Sadr to follow his statements on Twitter.
Volunteers unload ice blocks from a pick-up truck for the protesters.

Ali Al Safi (left), 35, travelled from the southern province of Thi Qar to serve the protesters with food. All photos: Sinan Mahmoud/The National

Mr Al Asadi, who is now on leave but acted as a political adviser to the powerful cleric, said politicians need to address the expectations of the public, a top demand of Mr Al Sadr.

“Sayed Al Sadr has always said he wants a prosperous, powerful and stable Iraq, these are general objectives but the detailed objectives must be drafted by specialists,” he said.

Since the US-led invasion that toppled former dictator Saddam Hussein, abuse of public funds has become part of the political culture in the war-torn country.

It has slowed the process of rebuilding, impacted good governance and the provision of public services.

Corruption is rife in Iraq and several ministers have been arrested or removed from office over the years, accused of stealing or misusing funds from the defence, electricity and trade ministries.

“We need a stable Iraq, inside and out to create a stable environment inside and around us,” he said.

Moqtada Al Sadr’s supporters continue to camp inside Iraq’s parliament

For Mr Al Sadr, it was clear that “neither the government that was formed post 2003, nor the others can address the country’s challenges.”

Mr Al Sadr’s political movement has controlled various ministries in the past including the health and water ministries, as well as having loyalists at the helm of the planning ministry and the ministry of public works in previous governments.

The populist cleric still has supporters in senior government positions within key ministries — alongside loyalists to the main post 2003 political parties, as well as loyalists within the foreign ministry.

As a result, the movement’s political opponents have levelled corruption accusations against the group. However, supporters of the cleric see him as a champion of the anti-corruption fight.

Since 2003, Mr Al Sadr has fought to end US and most recently Iranian influence over Iraq’s internal politics.

His political bloc won the plurality of seats in Parliament during October’s national elections, but still far short of a majority. It put them in pole position to form a government.

However, bitter political rivalries have made it impossible for parties to agree on forming a new government.

Mr Al Sadr’s rivals, the mostly Iran-backed Co-ordination Framework, have put forth the candidacy of Mohammed Al Sudani for prime minister.

But the cleric and his supporters have strongly opposed the nomination as they believe Mr Al Sudani is too close to former prime minister Nouri Al Maliki, a long-term rival of Mr Al Sadr widely blamed for presiding over successive corrupt governments.

Mr Al Asadi, who led the Sadrist-linked Al Ahrar bloc in parliament, said the cleric “believes those people have occupied government positions and we have not seen any good come out of it.”

“He is a firm believer in the capability of specialists to lead the country and that was the main reason why he’s objected to the people presented by the framework,” he said.

“We need to see changes on the ground because Iraqi people are not going to tolerate or accept new failures and without planning and drawing policies we cannot go further.”

Instead, Mr Al Sadr has been calling for the dissolving of the parliament and for early elections.

“These are very easy demands to implement by the government and political parties if they are serious about reforms and changes,” Mr Al Asadi said.

Mr Al Sadr has been listening to different sides of Iraq’s various opposition groups, Mr Al Asadi says, including Iraq’s small Communist party and groups linked to the protest movement known as the Tishreen, or “October” movement, named after widespread protests that erupted in October 2019, which were met with a vicious government crackdown, killing hundreds.

The populist cleric is close to those on the streets as he is “open to all ideas and that’s why when he talks he’s very close to people,” Mr Al Asadi says.

Mr Al Sadr is not just “listening to his close circle, he is also listening to academics and those that are affiliated to other political backgrounds such as the communists and others”.

“They say they have been contacted by people close to Mr Al Sadr so he is trying to do his best.”

One of the political elite’s main problems is that they are detached from the public, he said.

“They don’t know how people think, their traditions, especially those living in the outskirts of the cities, how they live, how the tribes interact with one another, they are fully detached,” Mr Al Asadi said.

“They are just living in the Green Zone.

“Some of them have their prestige and high living standards and they can’t feel or understand how people think right now.”