The American Nuclear Horn Threatens China: Daniel 7

US Nuclear Bombers ‘Roar & Soar’ Over Critical Military Base Near China; USAF Shares Mesmerizing Images

July 9, 2022

The US Air Force (USAF) has released some mesmerizing images of the four B-1B Lancers stationed at the highly strategic Anderson Air Force Base on Guam Island which is a treat for the eyes of aviation enthusiasts across the globe.

The EurAsian Times reported that the four B-1B Lancers arrived on Guam Island on June 4. So far, they have participated in the large-scale Valiant Shield exercise, plus the Exercise Diamond Storm 22 with the Australian Air Force.

The four B-1Bs can be seen in action in some breath-taking photos released by the USAF of their stint in the Pacific region amid rising tensions with China and fears of the much-anticipated nuclear test by North Korea.

These awe-inspiring images are dramatically the USAF’s efforts at visually documenting the current B-1 Bomber Task Force (BTF) deployment.Vortices and moisture stream from the wings of a B-1B as it flies behind a US Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to 506th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, during a Bomber Task Force mission over the Pacific Ocean, June 25, 2022. (USAF)

The US no longer maintains ‘Continous Bomber Presence’ in Guam as it used to until 2020, following which bomber presence deployments to the Indo-Pacific have been sporadic with the USAF’s B-1, B-52, and B-2 bomber force conducting long-range patrols to Russia’s eastern borders and the South China Sea, mainly from the continental US.

The last time such a significant bomber presence on Guam has been noted was in February 2021, when B-52Hs were deployed to the island for the annual Cope North multi-national military exercises.

Projecting long-range air power in the Pacific region is critical for the USAF, especially during heightened tensions with North Korea.A B-1B flies behind a US Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker, assigned to 506th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, during a Bomber Task Force mission over the Pacific Ocean on June 25, 2022. (USAF)

Therefore, shortly before the arrival of these four B-1B bombers in June, Korean media reportshad suggested that the latest BTF deployment could be related to the potential North Korean nuclear test.

So far, the B-1Bs are known to have been working with allies in the region and also took part in the ninth iteration of the Valiant Shield (VS) exercises, a series of large multi-domain wargames involving the US army, navy, marines, and airforce.

The exercises began on June 6 and lasted until June 17, concluding with the sinking exercise (SINKEX) on a decommissioned frigate, the ex-USS Vandegrift (FFG 48), which was fired upon with a range of munitions by various platforms.Formation during Valiant Shield 2022 (VS22) (US Navy)

These included the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), USS Benfold (DDG 65), USS Key West (SSN 722), and the F-18s & F-35Bs from the Marine Fighter Attack Squadrons (VMFA-533 and VMFA-121), along with the B-1B Lancers.

The munitions fired by the B-1Bs remain undisclosed, but reports suggest it could have been the AGM-158C Long-Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) or other precision ordnance.

In addition, B-1Bs also participated in Exercise Diamond Storm 22, which is the finale of the Royal Australian Air Force’s (RAAF’s) Air Warfare Instructor Course (AWIC), which took place from May 30 to June 24.A RAAF F/A-18F Super Hornet flies alongside a B-1B during Exercise Diamond Storm 2022 (Australian Department of Defense)

AWIC is a six-month course to train instructor candidates on various RAAF platforms, with aviators having exceptional talent selected to take part before returning to their units as instructors. It is similar to the USAF’s Weapons School Course or the US Navy’s Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center warfare schools, including ‘Top Gun.’

The latest B-1 deployment has come amid growing concerns about Guam’s vulnerability to enemy attack, especially from the various long-range and hypersonic weapons being developed by China.

Guam is home to major US military facilities, such as Andersen AFB, the only US base in the Western Pacific capable of storing heavy bombers for extended periods, which would be a vital element of any future potential US conflict in the Indo-Pacific region, for example, with China in case it invades Taiwan.Four B-1B Lancers assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, arrive Feb. 6, 2017, at Andersen AFB, Guam. The 9th EBS is taking over U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence operations from the 34th EBS, assigned to Ellsworth AFB, S.D. The B-1B’s speed and superior handling characteristics allow it to seamlessly integrate in mixed force packages. While deployed at Guam the B-1Bs will continue conducting flight operations where international law permit. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger)

Experts suggest that more than 50 US bombers armed with the new and stealthy AGM-158C LRASM – One B-1 can carry 24 LRASMs, and one B-52 can carry 20 – can threaten the Chinese warships operating almost anywhere in the Western Pacific.

Therefore, China has been consistently working to acquire the capabilities needed to destroy the key facilities on Guam to impede the US movement in the region.

For example, a few years ago, China unveiled the DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missile, which can kill targets up to 3400 miles (5471km) away. China labeled this missile “the Guam Killer.”

Furthermore, China released a propaganda video in 2020 depicting a simulated attack on Guam, in which nuclear-capable H-6 bomberscan be seen hitting what appears to be the US’ Andersen AFB.

The USAF is also investing in other airfields in the region that its bombers can potentially use. For example, the expansion work at the Tinian International Airport on Tinian Island, located 196 kilometers northeast of Guam, could provide an alternative operating location to Andersen AFB.

UN’s Nuclear Watchdog Says Iran Horn is Growing: Daniel 8

Uranium enrichment machines or centrifuges at Fordow. Undated

Iran has escalated its uranium enrichment with advanced machines at its underground Fordow plant, the UN atomic watchdog, IAEA, said in a report on Saturday.

Western diplomats have long expressed concern about devices this cascade, or cluster, of centrifuges is equipped with. 

The use of these so-called modified sub-headers means Iran could switch more quickly and easily to enriching to higher purity levels.

Iran’s move came ten days after indirect talks with the United States in Doha with the mediation of the European Union failed. The US said that Tehran did not come to the meeting in a serious negotiating posture and had simply repeated “extraneous” demands.

While Iran is required to inform the International Atomic Energy Agency about such a switch, if it chose not to, it might escape detection for some time as there is currently a lag between Iran’s enrichment and IAEA inspectors’ verification of what is produced.

“On 7 July 2022, Iran informed the Agency that, on the same day, it had begun feeding the aforementioned cascade with UF6 enriched up to 5% U-235,” the confidential report to IAEA member states said. Reuters reported on the development after seeing the IAEA report.

UF6 refers to uranium hexafluoride gas which is fed into centrifuges to be enriched.

In a report on June 20 also seen by Reuters, the IAEA said that months after Iran informed it of its intention to use the cascade, Iran had begun feeding UF6 into it for passivation, a process that comes before enrichment.

The IAEA verified on July 6 that passivation had ended, Saturday’s report said.

“On 9 July 2022, the Agency verified that Iran had begun feeding UF6 enriched up to 5% U-235 into the cascade of 166 IR-6 centrifuges with modified sub-headers for the declared purpose of producing UF6 enriched up to 20% U-235,” it said.

Iran is already enriching to up to 60% elsewhere, well above the up to 20% it produced before its 2015 deal with major powers that capped its enrichment level at 3.67% but still below the roughly 90% of weapons grade.

The move is the latest step of many to breach and move well beyond the restrictions which the 2015 deal imposed on Iran’s nuclear activities. It comes as talks to revive that deal are at an impasse and Western powers have warned time is running out to reach an agreement.

An agreement was said to have been close in March, after 11 months of talks in Vienna, but the negotiations stopped and remained stalled. The agreement would have removed major US economic sanctions, but Iran insisted that sanctions not directly related to the nuclear dispute should also be removed. On major cluster of sanctions target the Revolutionary Guard, but these are related to its role in terrorism and regional destabilization.

The United States pulled out of the 2015 nuclear agreement known as the JCPOA in 2018 under then-President Donald Trump, re-imposing sanctions against Tehran that the deal had lifted.

A year later, Iran began retaliating by breaching the deal’s restrictions on the level of uranium enrichment. Tehran further escalated enrichment as Joe Biden won the US presidential election and embarked on talks with Iran and other JCPOA signatories to revive the agreement.

Now, Iran has accumulated enough 60-percent enriched uranium to be able to take the next step of enriching the fissile material to 90 percent purity needed for one nuclear bomb.

With reporting by Reuters

Antichrist says Iraq a ‘prisoner of corruption’

Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr on September 21, 2018. Photo: AFP

Sadr says Iraq a ‘prisoner of corruption’

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region – Revered Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr warned Saturday of Iraq’s rampant corruption and foreign interference in the country.

“Iraq has become a prisoner of corruption and dependency and foreign interference,” Sadr tweeted on Eid al-Adha.

The Sadrist Movement leader continued by asking “God to bless Iraq and the Iraqis with reform” so that “Iraq and its people will be happy under the banner of religion, belief, and homeland” away from external interventions.

Iraqis headed to the election polls in October, the aim of holding early elections was to form a government that would fulfil the demands of the thousands of protesters who took to the streets of Baghdad and several southern provinces in 2019, forcing then prime minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi to resign.

The Sadrist Movement emerged from the elections as the victorious bloc with the most parliamentary seats and sought to form a national majority government in a tripartite alliance with the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) and the Sunni Sovereignty Alliance.

However, faced with staunch opposition from the pro-Iran Shiite parliamentary faction Coordination Framework, who insisted on forming a more traditional government based on political consensus, Sadr last month asked all 73 MPs of his bloc to submit their resignations in an effort to end the political impasse that has plagued the country since the October elections.

Their resignations were approved by Parliament Speaker Mohammed al-Halbousi shortly after.

It is unclear whether Sadr will continue to be an on-street opposition outside the parliament or accept the government that the Coordination Framework forms.

In May, Sadr blamed Iraq’s politicians for having “become an example of corruption and vice, except for a few” and stated that he has no intention of striking a deal with other Shiite blocs, a month before his eventual resignation from parliament.

Iraq continues to be mired in political instability with the country yet to form its next government a staggering nine months following early elections.

The worldwide hellscape of the bowls of wrath: Revelation 16

illustration of a city in ruins following war
Researchers aimed to better understand — so we can better prepare for — the dystopian landscape that would result from nuclear war. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Nuclear war would create ‘dire’ worldwide hellscape: scientists

Hannah Sparks

The threat of nuclear war goes well beyond the warfront.

Even far away from the terror seen by citizens and soldiers on the frontlines, Russia’s ongoing advancement into Ukraine has unsettled global economies as well as a sense of freedom and security abroad. 

As it should, say scientists, who warn of the grave danger that the aftermath of nuclear war poses for the planet.

Just nine nations of the world are in control of more than 13,000 nuclear weapons, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. With that in mind, earth sciences and computational researchers aimed to better understand — so we can better prepare for — the dystopian landscape that could result from nuclear war.

Various computer simulations of nuclear firestorms saw a future with scarce sunlight, food and resources — globally.

As soot and smoke from the blasts fill the upper atmosphere, temperatures would plunge 13 degrees Fahrenheit in the first month — bigger than the drop that occurred during the last ice age.

With clouds blocking the Sun, crops would fail, while algae — the basis of the marine food chain — would disappear, thus halting major fisheries. Meanwhile, expanding ice coverage due to the cold shock — growing by more than 6 million square miles and 6 feet deep — would block major ports from receiving shipments of food and other goods across seas, from Shanghai to Copenhagen.

graphical model of Global ocean temperature changes during and after nuclear war
The map shows global ocean temperature changes during and after nuclear war between the US and Russia.
graphical model of change in marine production and impact on fisheries
The models show the change in marine production and its impact on fisheries in the event of nuclear war between the US and Russia.

“It doesn’t matter who is bombing whom. It can be India and Pakistan or NATO and Russia. Once the smoke is released into the upper atmosphere, it spreads globally and affects everyone,” said Cheryl Harrison, an assistant professor at Louisiana State University, in a statement on behalf of a team of international researchers. Their work was published on Thursday in the journal Earth and space sciences journal AGU Advances, a Wiley publication.

Their simulations examined outcomes following drops of 4,400 100-kiloton nuclear weapons between the US and Russia, which would release more than 330 billion pounds of smoke and sunlight-absorbing black carbon into the upper atmosphere — or if 500 bombs weighing 100 kilotons each were detonated between India and Pakistan, which would see somewhere between 11 billion to 103 billion pounds of ash and smog ejected. (For comparison, the bombs that hit Nagasaki and Hiroshima in 1945 were 21 and 15 kilotons, respectively.)

Various Earth maps estimate post-war Arctic sea ice evolution in a US-Russia nuclear war scenario.
Various Earth maps estimate post-war Arctic sea-ice evolution in a US-Russia nuclear war scenario.
graphical model
A chart reveals the state of oceans globally before, during and after a US-Russia nuclear war. 

It’s critical for world leaders to consider their findings, said study co-author Alan Robock, a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University.

“Nuclear warfare results in dire consequences for everyone. World leaders have used our studies previously as an impetus to end the nuclear arms race in the 1980s, and five years ago to pass a treaty in the United Nations to ban nuclear weapons,” Robock said. “We hope that this new study will encourage more nations to ratify the ban treaty.”

Current global affairs should be a wake-up call, added Harrison. 

“The current war in Ukraine with Russia and how it has affected gas prices, really shows us how fragile our global economy and our supply chains are to what may seem like regional conflicts and perturbations,” she said.

Their models are not unlike what happens during massive volcanic eruptions, researchers noted.

“We can avoid nuclear war, but volcanic eruptions are definitely going to happen again. There’s nothing we can do about it, so it’s important when we’re talking about resilience and how to design our society that we consider what we need to do to prepare for unavoidable climate shocks,” Harrison said. “We can and must, however, do everything we can to avoid nuclear war. The effects are too likely to be globally catastrophic.”

Iranian Horn escalates enrichment with adaptable machines at Fordow

A number of new generation Iranian centrifuges are seen on display during Iran's National Nuclear Energy Day in Tehran

Exclusive: Iran escalates enrichment with adaptable machines at Fordow, IAEA reports

July 9, 20229:15 AM MDTLast Updated 11 hours ago

VIENNA, July 9 (Reuters) – Iran has escalated its uranium enrichment further with the use of advanced machines at its underground Fordow plant in a setup that can more easily change between enrichment levels, the U.N. atomic watchdog said in a report on Saturday seen by Reuters.

Western diplomats have long expressed concern about devices this cascade, or cluster, of centrifuges is equipped with.

The use of these so-called modified sub-headers means Iran could switch more quickly and easily to enriching to higher purity levels.

While Iran is required to inform the International Atomic Energy Agency about such a switch, if it chose not to, it might escape detection for some time as there is currently a lag between Iran’s enrichment and IAEA inspectors’ verification of what is produced.

“On 7 July 2022, Iran informed the Agency that, on the same day, it had begun feeding the aforementioned cascade with UF6 enriched up to 5% U-235,” the confidential report to IAEA member states said.

UF6 refers to uranium hexafluoride gas which is fed into centrifuges to be enriched.

In a report on June 20 also seen by Reuters, the IAEA said that months after Iran informed it of its intention to use the cascade, Iran had begun feeding UF6 into it for passivation, a process that comes before enrichment.

The IAEA verified on July 6 that passivation had ended, Saturday’s report said.

“On 9 July 2022, the Agency verified that Iran had begun feeding UF6 enriched up to 5% U-235 into the cascade of 166 IR-6 centrifuges with modified sub-headers for the declared purpose of producing UF6 enriched up to 20% U-235,” it said.

Iran is already enriching to up to 60% elsewhere, well above the up to 20% it produced before its 2015 deal with major powers that capped its enrichment level at 3.67% but still below the roughly 90% of weapons grade.

The move is the latest step of many to breach and move well beyond the restrictions which the 2015 deal imposed on Iran’s nuclear activities. It comes as talks to revive that deal are at an impasse and Western powers have warned time is running out to reach an agreement.

The United States pulled out of the deal in 2018 under then-President Donald Trump, re-imposing sanctions against Tehran that the deal had lifted.

A year later, Iran began retaliating by breaching the deal’s restrictions.

Reporting by Francois Murphy; editing by Alison Williams and Jason Neely

World War 3 warning: the Bowls of Wrath

World War 3 warning: Russia could plunge planet into ICE AGE with horror nuclear weapons

WERE RUSSIA and the US to go to nuclear war over Ukraine, the impact on the Earth could see the planet plunged into a new Ice Age, with devastating and long-term consequences.

By Ian Randall

 07:53, Fri, Jul 8, 2022 | UPDATED: 08:14, Fri, Jul 8, 2022

In their study, earth scientist Professor Cheryl Harrison of the Louisiana State University and her colleagues ran various models of the impact of nuclear warfare on the Earth’s system. They considered the effects on both a regional and larger scale — and factored in the current nuclear warfare capabilities of the world’s nations. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, nine nations currently control more than 13,00 nuclear weapons.

The researchers simulated the impacts of both nuclear conflict between Russia and the US, using 4,400 100-kiloton bombs, and India and Pakistan, involving 500 100-kiloton bombs.

In all of their computer simulations, the team found that nuclear firestorms would release soot and smoke into the upper atmosphere, blocking out the sun and leading to crop failures all around the world.

In the US–Russia scenario, more than 330 billion pounds of sunlight-blocking black carbon would be placed into the upper atmosphere, while an India–Pakistan conflict would produce 11–103 billion pounds of smoke and soot.

Furthermore, the first month following the nuclear detonations would see average global temperatures plunge by around 13F — a greater shift that was seen in the last Ice Age.

Prof Harrison said: “It doesn’t matter who is bombing whom. It can be India and Pakistan or NATO and Russia.

“Once the smoke is released into the upper atmosphere, it spreads globally and affects everyone.”

A mushroom cloud and a nuclear winter
Nuclear missiles

According to the researchers, the wake of nuclear war would see ocean temperatures fall rapidly — and this would not return to its pre-conflict state even after the smoke cleared.

As the planet cooled, sea ice would expand by more than six million square miles, reaching thickness of six feet in some basins while blocking major ports – including Copenhagen, St Petersburg and Beijing’s Port of Tianjin. In the worst case scenarios, these changes could last thousands of years.

The combination of darkness and falling ocean temperatures would kill algae — especially in the Atlantic and North Pacific oceans.

As algae are the foundation of the marine food web, this loss would cause a famine within the ocean, bringing aquaculture and fishing to a halt.

An infographic about Russia's nuclear arsenal
Sea ice

Oceans take longer to recover than land, the researchers noted. In the worst-case US–Russia scenario, they added, surface ocean recovery would be likely to take decades, while the deep ocean would need hundreds of years.

Paper author and climatologist Professor Alan Robock of Rutgers University said: “Nuclear warfare results in dire consequences for everyone.

“World leaders have used our studies previously as an impetus to end the nuclear arms race in the 1980s — and five years ago to pass a treaty in the United Nations to ban nuclear weapons.

“We hope that this new study will encourage more nations to ratify the ban treaty.”

The team said their findings highlight the interconnected nature of Earth’s systems.

Prof Harrison said: “The current war in Ukraine with Russia and how it has affected gas prices, really show us how fragile our global economy and our